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I have a form that let user enter values about address information. I want to compare the values I get from user, with information stored into ADDRESS table in the database. I have an entity class

public class Address {
  private String gevernate;
  private int homeNo;
  private String neighborhood;
  private String street;
} 

which is represented as a table in the database called ADDRESS.

and I have a view object for this class which return all address values from db tabel

public static Address getAddress(Connection Con, long stdID) {
// select stamatment and result set object.
}

The problem I face is that the form may NOT contain all values of Address object, it may contains only 2 or three values, it's specified at run time. How can I compare two objects ?

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Which, if any, of the fields above are part of a primary key index associated with the ADDRESS table in your database? –  Mike Samuel Jun 9 '11 at 0:36
    
If one address contains a different number of values than another, how can you compare them? In other words, how can you be sure that 123 Drury La., Funky Town is the same as 123 Drury La., Funky Town, CA? –  Maxpm Jun 9 '11 at 0:39
    
STDID number,the address is related to a student. –  palAlaa Jun 9 '11 at 0:39
    
@Maxpm, that exactly what I mean, I want to have some ideas to make the comparison. –  palAlaa Jun 9 '11 at 0:40
    
To clarify: This doesn't really have anything specific to do with databases or forms, you just want to compare two Address objects together, based on a sub-set of the data inside them, and you don't know what that subset will be at compile-time? –  Darien Jun 9 '11 at 0:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

add an equals method to the class like this:

public class Address {
    private String gevernate;
    private int homeNo;
    private String neighborhood;
    private String street;

public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj)
        return true;
    if (obj == null)
        return false;
    if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;
    Address other = (Address) obj;
    if (gevernate == null) {
        if (other.gevernate != null)
            return false;
    } else if (!gevernate.equals(other.gevernate))
        return false;
    if (homeNo != other.homeNo)
        return false;
    if (neighborhood == null) {
        if (other.neighborhood != null)
            return false;
    } else if (!neighborhood.equals(other.neighborhood))
        return false;
    if (street == null) {
        if (other.street != null)
            return false;
    } else if (!street.equals(other.street))
        return false;
    return true;
}
}
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how would you compare two addresses if one have gevernate, homeNo and the other has neighborhood and street defined? –  Bala R Jun 9 '11 at 0:46
    
This works for that too. It checks if null = null first before doing the accual check so you don't have to worry about that –  Stas Jaro Jun 9 '11 at 0:47
    
Going through each attribute is a good idea, I think, I am trying it right now, I wish it works. –  palAlaa Jun 9 '11 at 0:53
    
what does getClass() method return? –  palAlaa Jun 9 '11 at 1:26

Define/override equals() and hashcode() for the Address object. Compare as follows:

address1.equals(address2)
share|improve this answer
    
where define means override –  mre Jun 9 '11 at 0:39
    
@mre correct :) –  secreteyes Jun 9 '11 at 0:40

I would create an entirely separate class to do the comparisons, because they probably involve special logic and run-time configuration. As your application grows, it might involve some very complex stuff like matching states (NY versus New York), etc.

Do not use equals() for this, which should instead be whatever implementation makes sense for Java collections and general-purpose "is this object exactly the same or not" questions.

Basic idea:

int studentId = /* something */;
Connection conn = /* something */;
AddressForm form = /* something */;
Address userEnteredAddress = form.getEnteredAddress();
Address storedAddress = Address.getAddress(connection,studentId);
MyAddressComparer comp = new MyAddressComparer(form);
boolean similarEnough = comp.doMyVagueComparison(storedAddress,userEnteredAddress);

It's up to the code in AddressComparer to figure out what rules it needs to apply based on what the form was configured to do, and to do all those little special purpose tricks.

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Yes, making separate class from comparison is better than override equals method. But using collection is not clear for me actually.The way of going through each attribute is very clear. –  palAlaa Jun 9 '11 at 1:24

I'll just call this pseudocode, because I don't know Java:

if (this.gevernate != other.gevernate && this.gevernate != null && other.gevernate != null)
{
    // If both "gevernate" members are valid, but unequal...
    return false;
}

else if (this.homeNo != other.homeNo && this.homeNo != null && other.homeNo != null)
{
    // Repeat for "homeNo" values.
    return false;
}

// Repeat for the other two members.

else return true;
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