Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to create a binary non-unique tree using the preorder and postorder sequences ?
If so, how can this be done ? For example how could I make a non-unique tree for:

Preorder:

B C I J K H D E F G

Postorder:

I H K J C G F E D B

How many could there be ?

share|improve this question
    
You can construct a unique Binary Search Tree given any two traversals, are you looking to do that or are you in search of something else? If not please elaborate what you mean by non unique trees? –  nikhil Jun 18 '11 at 18:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

preorder psedo-code:

preorder (tree)
{
    if tree isn't empty then
    {
        print key[tree]
        preorder left[tree]
        preorder right[tree]
    }
}

and post order is:

postorder (tree)
{
    if tree isn't empty then
    {
        preorder left[tree]
        preorder right[tree]
        print key[tree]
    }
}

so from inorder order we can conclude:

  • "B" must be the root
  • "C" must be "B"'s child
  • "G" must be the the max value (the most far right node in the tree) or the min value in the left sub-tree (the most far left node in the left sub-tree) - in that case "G" must be a leaf and "F" must be "G"'s parent

and from postorder order we can conclude:

  • "I" must be a leaf and the min value (the most right node in the tree).
  • "H" must be "I"'s parent ("I" is "H" left child) in case I has no children, else "H" is the next far left child in the tree.

from here it's like a Sudoku:

enter image description here and yes: by using preorder and postorder outputs you can build a tree in only one way.

share|improve this answer

Yes, it is possible to construct different binary trees that have the same pre- and postorder sequences. To generate such different trees, look for subtrees where either the left or the right child is empty and simply swap the children.

This minimal example

  a         a
 /    vs.    \
b             b

shows two trees that both have the preordering a b and the postordering b a.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.