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  1. using #pragma comment(lib, "../../xxx.lib")
  2. using Visual studio project option enter image description here

What is the advantage and disadvantage between two method?
I'm finding way which is better convenient to manage for many projects.

And what method does Microsoft recommend?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The advantage of #pragma comment is that the user of your library cannot forget to add the setting. Or add the wrong one, it is not uncommon to get lost at the difference between the debug and release build and the /MD vs /MT build. One disadvantage is that troubleshooting linker problems can be difficult in some cases.

There's a third way that's hard to beat for convenience in a solution. Right-click the project that requires the library and click Project Dependencies. Tick the library project. This ensures that the library project is always built before the project and the .lib is automatically added.

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wow, I didn't know that VS add the lib automatically. Thanks. –  Benjamin Jun 9 '11 at 6:46
    
That's not always true since you can switch this option off in you project and I usually do since dependencies should mean only a build order to follow, not that I need that library. In some cases it's been a trouble for me. –  Mr.Gate Nov 27 '13 at 11:51
    
@Mr.Gate If you don't need the library, why do you need build order? –  Navin Mar 19 at 4:31
    
Hi, I got very wide solutions that have to build various libraries, DLL and executables. In this case the order of evaluation doesn't mean that you actually need that library to be used to build the following module. Anyway, that's probably due to my vice: I like having everything under control in complete solutions instead of creating single small solutions to deal with. –  Mr.Gate Jul 15 at 7:26

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