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I want to use a nested structure but i dont know how to enter data in it, for example:

struct A {
    int data;
    struct B;
};
struct B {
    int number;
};

So in the main when I come to use it :

int main() {
    A stage;
    stage.B.number;
}

Is that right if not how do i Use it??

share|improve this question

Each member variable of a struct generally has a name and a type. In your code, the first member of A has type int and name data. The second member only has a type. You need to give it a name. Let's say b:

struct A {
  int data;
  B b;
};

To do that, the compiler needs to already know what B is, so declare that struct before you declare A.

To access a nested member, refer to each member along the path by name, separated by .:

A stage;
stage.b.number = 5;
share|improve this answer
    
ahhh, your the man, so i dont say "struct B" I say "B b" , ok thanks – Shadi Jun 9 '11 at 2:40
    
Well, you can say struct B, but again, that's just the type. You still need give it a name. (Saying struct B instead of just B is more of a C style than C++, so if you write code that way, people will think you're weird.) – Rob Kennedy Jun 9 '11 at 2:41
    
The worst thing about it is that his original code is completely legal. It just doesn't do what he wants it to: his member struct B; declares that there is a nested class A::B, which will be defined later. And has nothing to do with the B which isn't nested. – James Kanze Jun 9 '11 at 7:31
    
@Shadi if the answer provided helped you solve your problem don't forget to click the check mark next to the question to officially accept it as the answer. – SC Ghost Jun 9 '11 at 21:16
struct B {  // <-- declare before
  int number;
};
struct A {
 int data;
 B b; // <--- declare data member of `B`
 };

Now you can use it as,

stage.b.number;
share|improve this answer

The struct B within A must have a name of some sort so you can reference it:

struct B {
    int number;
};
struct A {
    int data;
    struct B myB;
};
:
struct A myA;
myA.myB.number = 42;
share|improve this answer
1  
This is illegal. The definition of a member type must precede the member. – James Kanze Jun 9 '11 at 7:32
struct A {
    struct B {
       int number;
    };
    B b;
    int data;
};
int main() {
    A a;
    a.b.number;
    a.data;
}
share|improve this answer
struct A 
{
  int data;
  struct B
  {
    int number;
  }b;
};

int main()
{
  A stage = { 42, {100} };
  assert(stage.data == 42);
  assert(stage.b.number == 100);   
}
share|improve this answer
struct TestStruct {
    short Var1;
    float Var2;
    char Var3;

    struct TestStruct2 {
        char myType;
        CString myTitle;
        TestStruct2(char b1,CString b2):myType(b1), myTitle(b2){}
    };

    std::vector<TestStruct2> testStruct2;

    TestStruct(short a1,float a2,char a3): Var1(a1), Var2(a2), Var3(a3) {
        testStruct2.push_back(TestStruct2(0,"Test Title"));
        testStruct2.push_back(TestStruct2(4,"Test2 Title"));
    }       
};
std::vector<TestStruct> testStruct;

//push smthng to vec later and call 
testStruct.push_back(TestStruct(10,55.5,100));
TRACE("myTest:%s\n",testStruct[0].testStruct2[1].myTitle);
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