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i have directory that has 2 sub-directories and that again has few sub-directory and they have some files. I need to rename all the files to append an html extension to the filenames. the directory structure looks like this

main-directory
   sub-directory
   sub-directory
       sub-directory
          file1
          file2
          and so on to lot of files

now i could not use something like this

for file in main-directory/*
do
if [ -f "$file" ]
then `mv "$file" "$file.html"`
fi
done

because the for loop wont use the path recursively. so i used something like this

for file in `ls -1R main-directory`  // -1 for showing file and directory names separated by new lines and -R for recursive travel
do
if [ -f "$file" ]
then `mv "$file" "$file.html"`
fi
done

the above code is not able to rename files. to check whether the line

for file in `ls -1R main-directory`  

is working i wrote something like this

for file in `ls -1R main-directory`
do
if [ -f "$file" ]
echo $file
done

this doesn't show anything. what can be wrong?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you can use find and look into of type file and then -exec to change all the file and then appending the .html.

find main-directory -type f -exec mv -v '{}' '{}'.html \; 
share|improve this answer
    
@Jasonw: whats wrong with the above for loop? and can you explain your command? what does {} do and why \ in the end? –  lovesh Jun 9 '11 at 2:59
    
@lovesh, first, you if loop hash syntax error. second, ls only list the content of the directory, and then the if check validate if the file is exists. For your implementation, the file will not be shown before the file is not exists. before the if check, try do a echo $file and then do a pwd, you will understand. –  Jasonw Jun 9 '11 at 3:11
    
@Jasonw: i put an echo $file after do in for loop and i got a list of names and directories of main-directory each on a new line –  lovesh Jun 9 '11 at 4:02
    
@lovesh, this is my version, if you notice the $cur_dir and $file, the $cur_dir will always output where you execute this script. then the $file is the filename and not the absolute path. So when you do a check if [ -f "$file" ] ; bash could not locate the file. #!/bin/sh for file in ls -R main-directory; do cur_dir=pwd echo "where $cur_dir file $file" if [ -f "$file" ]; then echo $file fi done –  Jasonw Jun 9 '11 at 4:07
    
@Jasonw:: ya i got this i need to append the current directory name in front of the file –  lovesh Jun 9 '11 at 4:12

In your first for loop, the mv command should not be in back-ticks.

In your second for loop, the if-statement has incorrect syntax. There is no then or fi. It should be:

for file in `ls -1R main-directory`
do
if [ -f "$file" ]
then
   echo $file
fi
done

But even then, this won't work because ls -1R main-directory gives you just the file names, not the absolute paths to the file. Move your echo outside the if-statement to test:

for file in `ls -1R main-directory`
do
   echo $file
done

Therefor ls -1R main-directory is not a good way to get all files in the current directory. Use find . -type f instead.

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why not backticks for mv in first for loop. ya i forgot to put then, fi and done in this post but i had this in my code –  lovesh Jun 9 '11 at 18:46

For some reason, I can never remember the find ... -exec syntax off the top of my head with the {} and the \;. Instead, I've fallen into the habit of just using a loop fed from find:

find main-directory -type f | while read file
do
    mv "$file" "$file.html"
done

find outputs each file to stdout and the read file will consume one line at a time and set the contents of that line to the $file environment variable. You can then use that anywhere in the body of your loop.

I use this approach to solve lots of little problems like this where I need to loop over a bunch of output and do something useful. Because it is more versatile, I use it more than the esoteric find ... -exec {} \; approach.

Another trick is to prepend you command with echo to do a quick sanity check before doing potentially damaging things to your system:

find find main-directory -type f | while read file
do
    echo mv "$file" "$file.html"
done
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here is the answer to my question. people responded by 1 liners which are a neat approach but i didnt get much out of those 1 liners so here is something that i wanted

IFS=$'\n'   // this is for setting field separator to new line because the default is whitespace
dir=main-directory
for file in `ls -1R main-directory | sed 's/:$//'`  // -1 for showing file and directory names separated by new lines and -R for recursive travel
do
if [ -f "$dir/$file" ]
then `mv "$dir/$file" "$dir/$file.html"`
elif [ -d "$file" ]
then dir=$file
fi
done

here the sed 's/:$//' detects a : at the end of line and removes it. this was one of the things that prevented my code to run because whenever ls -1R main-directory detected a directory it appended a : at the end

share|improve this answer
    
The answers were one line because there isn't a reason to make it more than one line. I'd spend some time understanding the answers provided that use the find command instead of ls. Using find, you can avoid your issues above where you have to strip the : from the directory names and also keep track of the dir variable. Also, one issue that you didn't catch is dealing with spaces in the filenames or directories. –  Steve Prentice Jun 9 '11 at 21:24
    
@Steve Prentice: i have already acknowledged that the the other answers are better but i wanted to see if there was a way i could do it with a for loop and yes i realized that i was not dealing for spaces in file names so i have changed the field separator to a newline –  lovesh Jun 10 '11 at 4:24

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