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I noticed something that I can't quite explain. I made this javascript code that grows or shrinks a blue box. The script is here:

var animated = {

  timer : null,

  el : document.getElementById("divNavyBox"),

  startGrowAnimation : function() {

      this.stopAnimation();

      this.timer = setInterval(

          animated.doAnimation(5), 10);

  },

startShrinkAnimation : function() {

    this.stopAnimation();

    this.timer = setInterval(function() {

        animated.doAnimation(-5);

    }, 10);

},

stopAnimation : function() {

    clearInterval(this.timer);

},

doAnimation : function(amount) {

    var size = this.el.offsetWidth;



    if ((amount > 0 && size < 200) || (amount < 0 && size > 0)) {

        this.el.style.width = size + amount + "px";

        this.el.style.height = size + amount + "px";

    } else {

        this.stopAnimation();

    }

}

};

When the startGrowAnimation method of the animated class is called, the box visually grows until it reaches a certain width and height. It then stops. The startGrowAnimation code is located below:

startGrowAnimation : function() {
    this.timer = setInterval(function() {
        animated.doAnimation(5);
    }, 10); 
}

This code WORKS just fine. However, I don't understand WHY it's necessary to put an anonymous function in the parameter instead of just the normal call function. So, I replaced the code above with the code below:

startGrowAnimation : function() {

    this.stopAnimation();

    this.timer = setInterval(animated.doAnimation(5), 10);

},

When I use this code, for some reason, the box only increases in size by five pixels each time the startGrowAnimation method is called.

So, why is it necessary to include the startGrowAnimation method inside of an anonymous function call in this case?

share|improve this question
    
+1 - Great, thought-provoking question! –  jmort253 Jun 9 '11 at 6:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That code you tried will call that function and pass the return to setInterval(). That is obviously not what you want.

If you placed animated.doAnimation (a reference to the function) as the callback argument, the this value inside of that function will point to window, not the object itself. This is because it has lost the context of being called as a method of that object.

So you must call the method as a property of the object. This means you need to use an anonymous function wrapper so its body can be animated.doAnimation().

The only other way is not worth mentioning as it invokes an eval() type function.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Great answer! And yes, eval is definitely not worth mentioning. Probably not even worth mentioning it's not worth mentioning. I'm sure someone is going to go lookup what eval does and try to use it ;) –  jmort253 Jun 9 '11 at 6:03
    
That explains a lot. However, one thing does remain that still puzzles me. You explained how when it's not inside of an anonymous function the "this" property refers to the window object instead of the desired object. Every time I call the startGrowAnimation without wrapping the doAnimation statement in an anonymous function, it still grows by five pixels. It just only does it once instead of continually. That still doesn't completely make sense to me... –  idungotnosn Jun 9 '11 at 6:12
    
@Michael It can be very confusing :) What is happening is you are calling the function, not passing a reference to it. Its return value is passed as the first argument (undefined in this example) to setInterval(). –  alex Jun 9 '11 at 6:14

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