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Hi all is there simple way using json in .Net to ensure that the keys are sent as lower case.

At the moment I'm using the newtonsoft.json library and simply using

string loginRequest = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(auth);

In this case auth is just the following object

public class Authority
{
    public string Username { get; set; }
    public string ApiToken { get; set; }
}

This results in

{"Username":"Mark","ApiToken":"xyzABC1234"}

Is there away to ensure that the username and apitoken keys come through as lowercase ?

I don't want to simply run it through string.tolower() of course because the values for username & apitoken are mixed case.

I realise I can programically do this and create the json string manually, but i need this for approx 20 or so json data strings and seeing if i can save myself some time. Wondering if there are any already build libraries that allow you to enforce lowercase for key creation.

share|improve this question
    
Maybe the json serialization lib offers some kind of serialization attributes you could use to change the json-serialized names of your properties? –  tdammers Jun 9 '11 at 6:02
    
@tdammers, thanks I'm trying to find something that does that, but so far unsuccessful. Hoping someone here could point me to it. –  Mark Jun 9 '11 at 6:09
1  
This can be useful in case you propety consists of one word. –  Lipotam Jul 17 '12 at 14:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 50 down vote accepted

You can create a custom contract resolver for this. The following contract resolver will convert all keys to lowercase:

public class LowercaseContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver
{
    protected override string ResolvePropertyName(string propertyName)
    {
        return propertyName.ToLower();
    }
}

Usage:

var settings = new JsonSerializerSettings();
settings.ContractResolver = new LowercaseContractResolver();
var json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(authority, Formatting.Indented, settings);

Wil result in:

{"username":"Mark","apitoken":"xyzABC1234"}

If you always want to serialize using the LowercaseContractResolver, consider wrapping it in a class to avoid repeating yourself:

public class LowercaseJsonSerializer
{
    private static readonly JsonSerializerSettings Settings = new JsonSerializerSettings
    {
        ContractResolver = new LowercaseContractResolver()
    };

    public static string SerializeObject(object o)
    {
        return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(o, Formatting.Indented, Settings);
    }

    public class LowercaseContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver
    {
        protected override string ResolvePropertyName(string propertyName)
        {
            return propertyName.ToLower();
        }
    }
}

Which can be used like this:

var json = LowercaseJsonSerializer.SerializeObject(new { Foo = "bar" });
// { "foo": "bar" }

ASP.NET MVC4 / WebAPI

If you are using ASP.NET MVC4 / WebAPI, you can use a CamelCasePropertyNamesContractResolver from Newtonsoft.Json library which included by default.

share|improve this answer
    
that perfect, thanks for the help, most apprieciated –  Mark Jun 9 '11 at 6:15
    
@mvandersteen You're welcome! –  alexn Jun 9 '11 at 6:15
    
any reasonable way to do this in reverse? For deserialization? –  Shaun Rowan Mar 3 '12 at 21:42
1  
@Anzeo I have not tried to do that myself, and I did not find any information about that in the documentation. A solution would be to wrap JsonConvert.SerializeObject in your own class. See my update. –  alexn Jun 21 '12 at 7:48
2  
It seems, this custom contractresolver does not take into account the JsonProperty attribute, if you want to specify exceptions... e.g. [JsonProperty("alternateName")] still gets lowercased or is there another way to do it ? –  rekna Sep 29 '12 at 19:44

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