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Ok, So I need a list of all the positive integers. What first comes to mind is:

let numbers:Seq<bigint>=Seq.initInfinite n...

but initInfite isn't actually infitint: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee370429.aspx (unlike bigint) its only: Int32.MaxValue = 2,147,483,647 which is nowhere near big enough.

Currently my plan is to replace the sequence with some kind of handmade class (possibly implimenting IEnumerable). It would be simple (and possibly more effiecint for my use) but i want to know how to do this

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
let numbers:bigint seq = 
    let rec loop n = seq { yield n; yield! loop (n+1I) }
    loop 0I
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Yes.. I wish F# had type classes (as in Haskell) so that we didn't need the "skip" parameter in generic solution –  Ankur Jun 9 '11 at 16:24
    
This is possible in F# already. See my answer. –  Daniel Jun 9 '11 at 16:43
    
@Joel - just in case future readers don't read the full comment thread under Daniel's answer, I want to reiterate that there is no boxing in my version, just a single generic ref cell on the heap which is updated with each iteration. –  Stephen Swensen Jun 11 '11 at 17:21
    
I also updated my answer with an example of how to use generic language primitives to easily write a version of my function in terms of the original more flexible version with skip 1 built-in. –  Stephen Swensen Jun 11 '11 at 17:46
Seq.unfold (fun n -> Some(n, n + 1I)) 0I
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I checked it, it works. –  cfern Jun 9 '11 at 7:57
    
Does the I suffix indicate a literal is a bigint? –  Oxinabox Jun 9 '11 at 12:39
    
@Oxinabox: Yes. –  Daniel Jun 9 '11 at 13:57
    
Except 0 isn't a positive integer (everyone else made the same error). –  Stephen Swensen Jun 9 '11 at 15:20
1  
@Stephen: I suspect everyone made their function symmetric with Seq.initInfinite, which starts with 0. It seems more useful to do so. You can always Seq.skip 1 if needed. –  Daniel Jun 9 '11 at 15:52

I keep the following statically constrained function around since it is very flexible (you can specify the start value and the skip interval) and works with all numeric types:

let inline infiniteRange start skip = 
    seq {
        let n = ref start
        while true do
            yield n.contents
            n.contents <- n.contents + skip
    }

Type signature given by FSI:

val inline infiniteRange :
   ^a ->  ^b -> seq< ^a>
    when ( ^a or  ^b) : (static member ( + ) :  ^a *  ^b ->  ^a)

Here is how you generate all positive integers (BigInts, that is -- shown in FSI):

> infiniteRange 1I 1I;;
val it : seq<System.Numerics.BigInteger> =
  seq [1 {IsEven = false;
          IsOne = true;
          IsPowerOfTwo = true;
          IsZero = false;
          Sign = 1;}; 2 {IsEven = true;
                         IsOne = false;
                         IsPowerOfTwo = true;
                         IsZero = false;
                         Sign = 1;}; 3 {IsEven = false;
                                        IsOne = false;
                                        IsPowerOfTwo = false;
                                        IsZero = false;
                                        Sign = 1;}; 4 {IsEven = true;
                                                       IsOne = false;
                                                       IsPowerOfTwo = true;
                                                       IsZero = false;
                                                       Sign = 1;}; ...]

Update: and as Daniel showed, you can use generic language primitives to easily write another statically constrained function in terms infiniteRange with skip 1 built-in:

let inline infiniteRangeSkip1 start = 
    infiniteRange start LanguagePrimitives.GenericOne

Here's the type signature:

val inline infiniteRangeSkip1 :
   ^a -> seq< ^a>
    when ( ^a or  ^b) : (static member ( + ) :  ^a *  ^b ->  ^a) and
          ^b : (static member get_One : ->  ^b)
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+1 - A great usage of generic numeric ops. –  Daniel Jun 9 '11 at 15:49
2  
Is there a particular advantage here to accessing n.contents directly instead of using the (idiomatic) ! and := operators? –  ildjarn Jun 9 '11 at 16:08
    
@ildjarn - in this case I don't think there is any advantage (see @Daniels benchmarks). in general I simply don't like the look of those operators and am content to think of ref cells as normal objects (but perhaps I should get in line). but I've also been a bit wary of the ref cells operators ever since answering a question where they introduced different behavior from accessing contents directly: stackoverflow.com/questions/3019446/net-4-spinlock/… –  Stephen Swensen Jun 9 '11 at 16:38
1  
@Stephen : I would consider it a bug rather than an oversight in this case since it changes (and sometimes breaks, as you noted) the semantics of ref. And I suppose it's too late to change the semantics of something so fundamental as a built-in operator now. :-[ –  ildjarn Jun 9 '11 at 18:04
1  
Not that I'm aware of, but I bet Brian would tell us whether or not this particular change was made if we ask him nicely. ;-] Also, regarding SP1 being buggy -- it's not; there is a manifest file that doesn't get properly updated if you had previously installed the SP1 beta, but that's a trivial fix, and if you hadn't previously installed the SP1 beta there's no issue at all. –  ildjarn Jun 9 '11 at 18:37

You might even consider extending the Seq module if this is something you frequently need.

module Seq =
  let initInfiniteBig = 
    seq {
      let i = ref 0I
      while true do 
        yield !i
        i := !i + 1I
    }

let ten = Seq.initInfiniteBig |> Seq.take 10

Update

I benchmarked a few variations:

let initInfiniteBig = 
  seq {
    let i = ref 0I
    while true do 
      yield !i
      i := !i + 1I
  }

let initInfiniteBig2 = 
  seq {
    let i = ref 0I
    while true do 
      yield i.contents
      i.contents <- i.contents + 1I
  }

let initInfiniteBig3 = 
  let rec loop i = 
    seq {
      yield i
      yield! loop (i + 1I)
    }
  loop 0I

let initInfiniteBig4 = Seq.unfold (fun n -> Some(n, n + 1I)) 0I

let range s = s |> Seq.take 100000000 |> Seq.length |> ignore

range initInfiniteBig  //Real: 00:00:29.913, CPU: 00:00:29.905, GC gen0: 0, gen1: 0, gen2: 0
range initInfiniteBig2 //Real: 00:00:30.045, CPU: 00:00:30.045, GC gen0: 0, gen1: 0, gen2: 0
range initInfiniteBig3 //Real: 00:00:40.345, CPU: 00:00:40.310, GC gen0: 2289, gen1: 5, gen2: 0
range initInfiniteBig4 //Real: 00:00:30.731, CPU: 00:00:30.716, GC gen0: 1146, gen1: 4, gen2: 1

Update 2

Here's a generic range function, like Stephen's, but without start and skip.

let inline infiniteRange() : seq<'a> = 
  let zero : 'a = LanguagePrimitives.GenericZero
  let one : 'a = LanguagePrimitives.GenericOne
  seq {
      let n = ref zero
      while true do
          yield !n
          n := !n + one
  }

Here's the signature:

unit -> seq< ^a>
    when  ^a : (static member get_Zero : ->  ^a) and
          ^a : (static member get_One : ->  ^a) and
          ^a : (static member ( + ) :  ^a *  ^a ->  ^a)

And the benchmark:

range (infiniteRange() : seq<bigint>) //Real: 00:00:30.042, CPU: 00:00:29.952, GC gen0: 0, gen1: 0, gen2: 0
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1  
I would strongly favor recursion here rather than use of ref, since this unnecessarily boxes every element (bigint is a value type). –  ildjarn Jun 9 '11 at 16:11
3  
@ildjarn: You would think, but it turns out not to be the case. In fact, the recursive version is the only one that's discernibly slower. I updated my answer with benchmarks. –  Daniel Jun 9 '11 at 16:33
1  
@Stephen : Apparently I'm not awake enough yet. My line of thought was that because ref itself is a reference type, each use of ref would effectively box the value it contains -- in and of itself, accurate. But of course, in this code there is only a single use of ref, as opposed to one use of ref per element. I think I'll stop commenting for a few hours until my brain is doing its job better. :-P –  ildjarn Jun 9 '11 at 16:49
1  
@Daniel - Your version without start and skip parameters is going to default to int unless you specify otherwise when you call it. I think that's the main reason it's faster than the other ones, which are all hard-coded to BigInt. I found it to be slightly slower than an int version of infiniteBig. –  Joel Mueller Jun 9 '11 at 17:04
2  
@Daniel, @Stephen : I looked at the generated IL for the recursive version, and the code generated for its state machine is abysmal (possibly a pathological case, but I doubt it). By my count, when the first element is yielded there is 1 reference allocation and 7 bigint value copies; elements subsequently yielded each cause 2 reference allocations and 12 bigint value copies, 1 and 5 of which (respectively) are completely unused/wasted. I haven't looked at the output of the C# compiler for a roughly-equivalent C# enumerator, but I imagine it must be significantly better than this... :-/ –  ildjarn Jun 9 '11 at 18:04

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