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template<>
class A{
//some class data
};

I have seen this kind of code many times. what is the use of template<> in the above code? And what are the cases where we need mandate the use of it?

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2  
I just Googled c++ empty template and found this as the first result. You should try using Google too. –  trutheality Jun 9 '11 at 6:24
2  
oh...i tried to google it before posting this with "template<>" which does not yield me good results.Thanks for the right search key word.But i think the SO has more good answers that it. –  Vijay Jun 9 '11 at 6:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 35 down vote accepted

template<> tells the compiler that a template specialization follows, specifically a full specialization. Normally, class A would have to look something like this:

template<class T>
class A{
  // general implementation
};

template<>
class A<int>{
  // special implementation for ints
};

Now, whenever A<int> is used, the specialized version is used. You can also use it to specialize functions:

template<class T>
void foo(T t){
  // general
}

template<>
void foo<int>(int i){
  // for ints
}

// doesn't actually need the <int>
// as the specialization can be deduced from the parameter type
template<>
void foo(int i){
  // also valid
}

Normally though, you shouldn't specialize functions, as simple overloads are generally considered superior:

void foo(int i){
  // better
}

And now, to make it overkill, the following is a partial specialization:

template<class T1, class T2>
class B{
};

template<class T1>
class B<T1, int>{
};

Works the same way as a full specialization, just that the specialized version is used whenever the second template parameter is an int (e.g., B<bool,int>, B<YourType,int>, etc).

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+1. Simple and concise –  Nawaz Jun 9 '11 at 6:24
    
@Nawaz: Still? :P –  Xeo Jun 9 '11 at 6:24
1  
+1 Good answer! Maybe you should add that this is a full template specialization. Even though.. with one template parameter, there's no partial specialization possible anyway. –  Christian Jun 9 '11 at 6:28
    
@Christian: Was just editing that in! –  Xeo Jun 9 '11 at 6:30
2  
@Downvoter: Don't stay anonymous, we're not some weird imageboard here! –  Xeo Jun 9 '11 at 6:39

template<> introduces a total specialization of a template. Your example by itself isn't actually valid; you need a more detailed scenario before it becomes useful:

template <typename T>
class A
{
    // body for the general case
};

template <>
class A<bool>
{
    // body that only applies for T = bool
};

int main()
{
    // ...
    A<int>  ai; // uses the first class definition
    A<bool> ab; // uses the second class definition
    // ...
}

It looks strange because it's a special case of a more powerful feature, which is called "partial specialization."

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Explicit (not "total") specialization is not a special case of partial specialization. Explicit specialization defines a class identified by a template-id; partial specialization defines a new template accessed through a primary template. –  Potatoswatter Jun 9 '11 at 17:54
    
I prefer the term "total," because it is opposed by "partial" (which is a thing), whereas "explicit" is opposed by "implicit" (which is not a thing). I'm aware that it's not the standard term. Syntactically, explicit specialization is a special case of partial specialization, even if the most standards-correct way to look at the two makes a distinction between classes and class templates. –  John Calsbeek Jun 9 '11 at 18:27

Doesn't look right. Now, you might have instead written:

template<>
class A<foo> {
// some stuff
};

... which would be a template specialisation for type foo.

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