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I want to update rows in my table with starting from 1001 to next 1000.

I tried with following query:

UPDATE `oltp_db`.`users` SET p_id = 3 LIMIT 1001, 1000
  1. This is giving me syntax error. Is this correct? am I doing any mistake here.
  2. Can we limit update in this way?

Also, the rows that I am trying to update are having Null value for the column p_id which is having data type INTEGER. Due to this I am not even able to update using following query:

UPDATE `oltp_db`.`users` SET p_id = 3 WHERE p_id = null
  1. Is my above query correct?
  2. What can be done to achieve this?
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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When dealing with null = does not match the null values you can use IS NULL or IS NOT NULL

UPDATE `smartmeter_usage`.`users_reporting` 
SET panel_id = 3 WHERE panel_id IS NULL

LIMIT can be used with UPDATE but with the row count only

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Thank you for the response. Can you please give me an insight of why IS NULL different from = null. Also. what exactly IS NULL does to find null values? –  srahul07 Jun 9 '11 at 8:38
1  
@srahul07: Because NULL is not a real value and = check for the equality of two values. Hence = does not match null. –  Framework Jun 9 '11 at 9:24
    
@Framework, update limit with row count not working for mysql version 5.1.X –  Pragnesh Chauhan May 29 at 7:47

if you want to update multiple rows using limit in mysql...use this

UPDATE table_name SET name='test'
     WHERE id IN (
         SELECT id FROM (
             SELECT id FROM table_name 
             ORDER BY id ASC  
             LIMIT 0, 10
         ) tmp
     );
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6  
MySQL 5.5 does not support LIMIT in IN/ALL/ANY/SOME subquery: Error Code 1235 –  FiveO Feb 11 at 18:34
2  
@FiveO Works fine for me on MySQL 5.5.34. Without the nested subquery (the perverse SELECT id FROM (SELECT id FROM ...) construct) I get ERROR 1235 (42000): This version of MySQL doesn't yet support 'LIMIT & IN/ALL/ANY/SOME subquery', but if I include both selects as shown here, the query works. –  Mark Amery Jul 6 at 21:27
    
This works, but i cant get why it works :/ –  Vertig0 Jul 7 at 19:15

I would suggest a two step query

I'm assuming you have an autoincrementing primary key because you say your PK is (max+1) which sounds like the definition of an autioincrementing key.
I'm calling the PK id, substitute with whatever your PK is called.

1 - figure out the primary key number for column 1000.

SELECT @id:= id FROM smartmeter_usage LIMIT 1 OFFSET 1000

2 - update the table.

UPDATE smartmeter_usage.users_reporting SET panel_id = 3 
WHERE panel_id IS NULL AND id >= @id 
ORDER BY id 
LIMIT 1000

Please test to see if I didn't make an off-by-one error; you may need to add or subtract 1 somewhere.

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UPDATE `smartmeter_usage`.`users_reporting` SET panel_id = 3 LIMIT 1001, 1000

This query is not correct (or at least i don't know a possible way to use limit in UPDATE queries), you should put a where condition on you primary key (this assumes you have an auto_increment column as your primary key, if not provide more details):

UPDATE `smartmeter_usage`.`users_reporting` SET panel_id = 3 WHERE primary_key BETWEEN 1001 AND 2000

For the second query you must use IS

UPDATE `smartmeter_usage`.`users_reporting` SET panel_id = 3 WHERE panel_id is null

EDIT - if your primary_key is a column named MAX+1 you query should be (with backticks as stated correctly in the comment):

UPDATE `smartmeter_usage`.`users_reporting` SET panel_id = 3 WHERE `MAX+1` BETWEEN 1001 AND 2000

To update the rows with MAX+1 from 1001 TO 2000 (including 1001 and 2000)

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1  
You make the assumption that he has an auto_increment on the table, which might not be the case, nor does it have to be an unbroken series of numbers. –  jishi Jun 9 '11 at 8:02
    
well, yes, of course i'm making that assumption, i'll update the answer with that, waiting for more information! :) –  Nicola Peluchetti Jun 9 '11 at 8:04
    
Thank you for response. Actually the primary key is MAX+1. –  srahul07 Jun 9 '11 at 8:34
    
-1, (A) max is a reserved word, needs to be quoted in backticks. (B) max + 1 between 1001 and 2000 should be rewritten to max between 1000 and 1999. (C) I've never heard of a primary key called max+1 that makes no sense. (D) This code assumes column max is continous, which is not guaranteed by any means. (E) limit does work with update. –  Johan Jun 9 '11 at 9:20
    
Great answer. Your first UPDATE query works perfect if you have a PK auto increment! –  B4NZ41 Feb 7 '12 at 15:32

You should use IS rather than = for comparing to NULL.

UPDATE `smartmeter_usage`.`users_reporting`
SET panel_id = 3
WHERE panel_id IS null

The LIMIT clause in MySQL when applied to an update does not permit an offset to be specified.

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This helped me in a similar but different situation - query should have read "update my_table set process_id = n limit 1000" instead of "update my_table set process_id = n limit 0,1000" –  rrrhys Sep 29 '13 at 23:04

You should highly consider using an ORDER BY if you intend to LIMIT your UPDATE, because otherwise it will update in the ordering of the table, which might not be correct.

But as Will A said, it only allows limit on row_count, not offset.

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