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"tree" structured list:

[(1,1,(1,1,(1,"1"))),(1,1,1),(1,),1,(1,(1,("1")))]  # may be more complex
  1. How to traversing it and print each item - I means the 1 and the "1"?

  2. How to generate type list with same structure?

    [('int','int',('int','int',('int','str'))),('int','int','int'),('int',),'int',('int',('int',('str')))]

    the 'int', 'str' here should be output of type(1) and type("s") as it can not been displayed on the question

Thanks!

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(1) is not a tuple. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 9 '11 at 8:38
    
(1,) is a tuple. –  Sean Pedersen Jun 9 '11 at 8:42
    
fixed, but [(1)] can also been accepted in this list same as [1] –  user478514 Jun 9 '11 at 8:43
    
To flatten a "list of list" use [item for sublist in l for item in sublist] –  Fredrik Pihl Jun 9 '11 at 8:44
    
So for your second question, what exactly are you trying to do? You just want to replace the "nodes" with their types? –  Jeff Mercado Jun 9 '11 at 8:51
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can create a generator that will traverse the tree for you for (1).

def traverse(o, tree_types=(list, tuple)):
    if isinstance(o, tree_types):
        for value in o:
            for subvalue in traverse(value):
                yield subvalue
    else:
        yield o

data = [(1,1,(1,1,(1,"1"))),(1,1,1),(1,),1,(1,(1,("1",)))]
print list(traverse(data))
# prints [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, '1', 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, '1']

for value in traverse(data):
    print repr(value)
# prints
# 1
# 1
# 1
# 1
# 1
# '1'
# 1
# 1
# 1
# 1
# 1
# 1
# 1
# '1'

Here is one possible approach to (2).

def tree_map(f, o, tree_types=(list, tuple)):
    if isinstance(o, tree_types):
        return type(o)(tree_map(f, value, tree_types) for value in o)
    else:
        return f(o)

data = [(1,1,(1,1,(1,"1"))),(1,1,1),(1,),1,(1,(1,("1",)))]
print tree_map(lambda o: type(o).__name__, data)
# prints [('int', 'int', ('int', 'int', ('int', 'str'))), ('int', 'int', 'int'), ('int',), 'int', ('int', ('int', ('str',)))]
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, 1 works and 2 is not what I want, but still useful. –  user478514 Jun 9 '11 at 9:10
    
I reread your question and think I fixed (2). –  Jeremy Banks Jun 9 '11 at 9:18
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for #2 you can use this recursive lamba function and use it in map

   f = lambda o: (isinstance(o, tuple) and  tuple(map(f, o))) or type(o).__name__
   map(f, [(1,1,(1,1,(1,"1"))),(1,1,1),(1,),1,(1,(1,("1")))])

returns: [('int', 'int', ('int', 'int', ('int', 'str'))), ('int', 'int', 'int'), ('int',), 'int', ('int', ('int', 'str'))]

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You can walk any tree-like structure easily using recursion. Just define a function that would look at all it's children. Though traditionally, each child is itself a tree however in your case, it might be. So I guess you could do something like this:

def traverseit(tree):
    if hasattr(tree, '__iter__'):
        for subtree in tree:
            traverseit(subtree)
    else:
        print(tree)


For your second question, assuming you just want to get a new "tree" that replaces the "nodes" with their types, simple:

def transformit(tree):
    nodetype = type(tree)
    if hasattr(tree, '__iter__'):
        return nodetype(transformit(subtree) for subtree in tree)
    else:
        return nodetype
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, I got the idea now, for q2, the point is, recursion if a node has __iter__, may I know if a class override the __iter__, what it will return? –  user478514 Jun 9 '11 at 9:18
    
@user: Both parts of my answer should allow any iterable object (excluding strings) to act as a tree. So if you have any type that implements the __iter__() function, then it is considered a tree and will be used accordingly. I wasn't sure if you wanted to restrict it to lists and tuples. Do you only want lists and tuples be the trees only? –  Jeff Mercado Jun 9 '11 at 9:22
    
may no, I am in thinking now some other kind of class will be the item in this tree later. I just tested : no matter if I override init_ or not in a class, your code will return the type 'instance', that is OK, but for the dict type with actual data {"a":1,"b":2}, it will raise TypeError: cannot convert dictionary update sequence element #0 to a sequence –  user478514 Jun 9 '11 at 9:33
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