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I am reading a file containing keywords line by line, and found a strange problem. I hope lines that following each other if their contents are the same, they should be handled only once. Like

sony
sony

only the first one is got processed. but the problems is, java doesn't treat them as equals.

INFO: [, s, o, n, y]
INFO: [s, o, n, y]

My code looks like the following, where's the problem?

    FileReader fileReader = new FileReader("some_file.txt");
    BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(fileReader);
    String prevLine = "";
    String strLine
    while ((strLine = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {
        logger.info(Arrays.toString(strLine.toCharArray()));
        if(strLine.contentEquals(prevLine)){
            logger.info("Skipping the duplicate lines " + strLine);
            continue;
        }
        prevLine = strLine;
    }

Update:

It seems like there's leading a space in the first line, but actually not, and the trim approach doesn't work for me. They're not the same:

INFO: [, s, o, n, y]
INFO: [ , s, o, n, y]

I don't know what's the first Char added by java.

Solved: the problem was solved with BalusC's solution, thanks for pointing out it's BOM problem which helped me to find out the solution quickly.

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1  
does the file start with the byte sequence ef bb bf? If so, it is a UTF-8 file with a BOM. –  McDowell Jun 9 '11 at 9:14
    
Nope, it's UTF encoding, but not starts with the sequence you mentioned. –  Sawyer Jun 9 '11 at 9:24
    
post the hex dump of the first two lines and the default charset of the system. Otherwise, we're just playing guess-the-code-point. –  McDowell Jun 9 '11 at 11:54

5 Answers 5

Try trimming whitespace at the beginning and end of lines read. Just replace your while with:

while ((strLine = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {
        strLine = strLine.trim();
        logger.info(Arrays.toString(strLine.toCharArray()));
    if(strLine.contentEquals(prevLine)){
        logger.info("Skipping the duplicate lines " + strLine);
        continue;
    }
    prevLine = strLine;
}
share|improve this answer
    
No see my update. –  Sawyer Jun 9 '11 at 8:58
    
@Sawyer - You might have an encoding problem with your text file then. I just tried your example and it works perfectly as is. –  Nico Huysamen Jun 9 '11 at 9:07

There must be a space or some non-printable character in the start. So, either fix that or trim the Strings during/before comparison.

[Edited]

In case String.trim() is of no avail. Try String.replaceAll() using proper regex. Try this, str.replaceAll("\\p{Cntrl}", "").

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No, see my update. –  Sawyer Jun 9 '11 at 8:58
    
@Sawyer: Updated my post. –  Adeel Ansari Jun 9 '11 at 9:09

If spaces are not important in the processing it would probably be worth doing a strLine.trim() call each time anyway. This is what I generally do when handling input like this - spaces can easily creep into a file if it has to be edited manually and if they're not important they can and should be ignored.

Edit: is the file encoded as UTF-8? You may need to specify the encoding when you open the file. It could be the byte order mark or something like that, if it's happening on the first line.

Try:

BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file), "UTF8"))
share|improve this answer
    
No, see my update. –  Sawyer Jun 9 '11 at 8:59
1  
@Sawyer You may need to specify the file encoding when you open the file, I've edited. –  Phill Sacre Jun 9 '11 at 9:14
    
Yeah, it's encoded by UTF-8, and I tried your code, doesn't work. –  Sawyer Jun 9 '11 at 9:51

What is the encoding of the file?

The unseen char at the start of the file could be the Byte Order Mark

Saving with ANSI or UTF-8 without BOM can help highlight this for you.

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I had a similar case in my previous project. The culprit was the Byte order mark, which I had to get rid of. Eventually I implemented a hack based on this example. Check it out, might be that you have the same problem.

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