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I am trying to optimize a small piece of code with SSE intrinsics (I am a complete beginner on the topic), but I am a little stuck on the use of conditionals.

My original code is:

unsigned long c;
unsigned long constant = 0x12345678;
unsigned long table[256];
int n, k;

for( n = 0; n < 256; n++ )
{
  c = n;
  for( k = 0; k < 8; k++ )
    {
      if( c & 1 ) c = constant ^ (c >> 1);
      else c >>= 1;
    }
  table[n] = c;
}

The goal of this code is to compute a crc table (the constant can be any polynomial, it doesn't play a role here),

I suppose my optimized code would be something like:

__m128 x;
__m128 y;
__m128 *table;

x = _mm_set_ps(3, 2, 1, 0);
y = _mm_set_ps(3, 2, 1, 0);
//offset for incrementation
offset = _mm_set1_ps(4);

for( n = 0; n < 64; n++ )
{
    y = x;
    for( k = 0; k < 8; k++ )
    {
        //if do something with y
        //else do something with y
    }
    table[n] = y;
    x = _mm_add_epi32 (x, offset);
}

I have no idea how to go through the if-else statement, but I suspect there is a clever trick. Has anybody an idea on how to do that?

(Aside from this, my optimization is probably quite poor - any advice or correction on it would be treated with the greatest sympathy)

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If the loops are not very huge then you should try to keep outer loop smaller than inner loops. This will cause lesser initializations of inner loops (i.e. it should be n < 8 and k < 64) –  iammilind Jun 9 '11 at 9:12
    
The for statement uses semicolons, not commas, to separate its components. –  FredOverflow Jun 9 '11 at 10:19
    
@Fred, oops, mistake when I copied into the editor, corrected. Thanks. –  drolex Jun 9 '11 at 10:25
    
Couldn't you just have used the traditional method known as "copy-and-paste" instead of re-typing the code yourself? The stack overflow editor does support Ctrl+V, you know ;) –  FredOverflow Jun 9 '11 at 10:32
3  
This copy-paste thing sounds like a high-end technology, it's probably not very reliable. I will use it when the early adopters will have tested it thoroughly. –  drolex Jun 9 '11 at 10:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can get rid of the if/else entirely. Back in the days when I produced MMX assembly code, that was a common programming activity. Let me start with a series of transformations on the "false" statement:

c >>= 1;

c = c >> 1;

c = 0 ^ (c >> 1);

Why did I introduce the exclusive-or? Because exclusive-or is also found in the "true" statement:

c = constant ^ (c >> 1);

Note the similarity? In the "true" part, we xor with a constant, and in the false part, we xor with zero.

Now I'm going to show you a series of transformations on the entire if/else statement:

if (c & 1)
    c = constant ^ (c >> 1);          // same as before
else
    c =        0 ^ (c >> 1);          // just different layout

if (c & 1)
    c =  constant      ^ (c >> 1);
else
    c = (constant & 0) ^ (c >> 1);    // 0 == x & 0

if (c & 1)
    c = (constant & -1) ^ (c >> 1);   // x == x & -1
else
    c = (constant &  0) ^ (c >> 1);

Now the two branches only differ in the second argument to the binary-and, which can be calculated trivially from the condition itself, thus enabling us to get rid of the if/else:

c = (constant & -(c & 1)) ^ (c >> 1);

Disclaimer: This solution only works on a two's complement architecture where -1 means "all bits set".

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This is perfectly clear, thank you very much. –  drolex Jun 9 '11 at 10:28

The first step in efficiently computing CRC is using a wider basic unit than the bit. See here for an example of how to do this byte per byte.

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Nice link, thanks. –  drolex Jun 9 '11 at 9:41

The idea in SSE is to build both results and then blend the results together.

E.g. :

__m128i mask = ...; // some way to build mask[n] = 0x1
__m128i constant = ...;

__m128i tmp_c = _mm_xor_si128( _mm_srli_epis32( c, 1 ), constant );
__m128i tmp_c2 = _mm_srli_epis32( c, 1 );

__m128i v = _mm_cmpeq_epi32( c, mask );
tmp_c = _mm_and_epi32( tmp_c, mask );
tmp_c2 = _mm_andnot_si128( mask, tmp_c2 );
c = _mm_or_si128( tmp_c, tmp_c2 );
// or in sse4_1
c = _mm_blendv_epi8( tmp_c, tmp_c2, mask );

Note beside, this is not complete code, only to demonstrate the principle.

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