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I have a very simple Windows Forms Application. And, in Windows (or, atleast Windows Forms Applications), when you press Enter while inside a Single-line TextBox Control, you hear a Ding. It's an unpleasent sound, that indicated you cannot enter a newline, because it is a single-line TextBox.

This is all fine. However, in my Form, I have 1 TextBox, and a Search Button. And I am allowing the user to Perform a search by pressing Enter after they've finished typing, so they don't have to use the mouse to click the Search Button.

But this Ding sound occurs. It's very annoying.

How can we make it so just that sound doesn't play at all in my Form?

@David H - Here's how I'm detecting the enter pressing:

private void textBox1_KeyUp(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Enter)
    {
        // Perform search now.
    }
}
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How do you detect that Enter has been pressed when the focus is in the text box? –  David Heffernan Jun 9 '11 at 9:51
    
In the Properties Pane, you double-click the KeyDown or KeyUp Event. Then, in Code View, you type the code that I'm about to put in my question for yah. –  bendr Jun 9 '11 at 9:56
    
KeyPress is probably the right event, and you want to set e.Handled = true –  David Heffernan Jun 9 '11 at 9:57
    
Thank you, @David, I did not know this :) –  bendr Jun 9 '11 at 10:00
3  
I wish there was some way to suppress the annoying ding but allow the key press to bubble up. Sometimes a key press is just a key press, no need for alarm. –  flipdoubt Sep 2 '11 at 12:15

8 Answers 8

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Check out the Form.AcceptButton property. You can use it to specify a default button for on a form, in this case for pressing enter.

From the docs:

This property enables you to designate a default action to occur when the user presses the ENTER key in your application. The button assigned to this property must be an IButtonControl that is on the current form or located within a container on the current form.

There is also a CancelButton property for when the user presses escape.

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Thank you @mdm, this worked the best for me. :) I will come back to upvote when I have more rep. –  bendr Jun 9 '11 at 10:52
1  
@bendr i have the same problem .. but im using UserControl .. it doesn't have Form.AcceptButton .. how to fix it? –  Murhaf Sousli Feb 1 '12 at 18:57

Try

textBox.KeyPress += new KeyPressEventHandler(keypressed);

private void keypressed(Object o, KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Enter)
    {
        e.Handled = true; //this line will do the trick
    }
}
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Correct, but it will only work if the focus is still on the TextBox. What about if the user presses Tab first? –  mdm Jun 9 '11 at 9:56
1  
@mdm Depends on the UI design. Perhaps OP only wants this action when focus is on the text box. That's pretty common. –  David Heffernan Jun 9 '11 at 9:56
1  
If the user pressed Tab, the focus will no longer be on the TextBox, the next Contorl that will be Focused is the Button Control, which doesn't make that sound when you press Enter on it. :-) –  bendr Jun 9 '11 at 9:58
    
@David, thanks for your example. I just tried it. And Whenever I put the e.Handled = true in the .KeyPress event, none of the other code executes. The only thing that happens is all the Text in the TextBox becomes selected (and I don't even have code that selects any text) –  bendr Jun 9 '11 at 10:15
2  
does not work .Net 3.0 Win 8 –  Paedow Oct 18 '13 at 17:07

It works for me:

private void textBox1_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{

    //Se apertou o enter
    if (e.KeyCode == Keys.Enter)
    {
        //enter key is down

        this.doSomething();

        e.Handled = true;
        e.SuppressKeyPress = true;

     }

 }

The SuppressKeyPress is the really trick. I hope that help you.

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5  
This is the only valid answer, in my opinion. e.Handled = true; was insufficient; it was the SuppressKeyPress that did the trick. –  Jonathon Reinhart Jul 29 '13 at 20:07
1  
textBox1_KeyUp will ding in this situation regardless of Handled or SuppressKeyPress –  stackuser83 Oct 21 '13 at 17:01
    
It doesn't happened with me. But is possible that you should do it to stop ding. In my case, I used the last visualStudio release. []s. –  Lucio Fonseca Oct 21 '13 at 17:20

I stumbled on this post while trying to handle a KeyDown this worked for me.

If e.KeyCode = Keys.Enter Then
   e.SuppressKeyPress = True
   btnLogIn.PerformClick()
End If

Supressing the Key Press stops the event from being sent to the underlying control. This should work if you're manually handling everything that the enter key will be doing within that textbox. Sorry about the Visual Basic.

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Set your Search button's IsDefault property to true. This will make it a default button and it will be auto-clicked when Enter is pressed.

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From the docs you linked to To specify the default button of a form, set the AcceptButton property of the form to the desired button. –  mdm Jun 9 '11 at 9:57
    
Yes, I've investigated this myself. It seems both approaches are interchangeable. AcceptButton seems more stylish, but I'm used to IsDefault myself. –  Zruty Jun 9 '11 at 9:59
void RTextBox_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.KeyData == Keys.Enter)
    {
        //do ...
        bool temp = Multiline;
        Multiline = true;
        e.Handled = true;
        Multiline = temp;
    }
}
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This is a redundant answer with only code, no explanation. Also, all of the Multiline code is completely irrelevant. –  Jonathon Reinhart Jul 29 '13 at 20:08
$("#txtSomething").keypress(function (e) {
        if (e.which == 13) {

            e.Handled = true; //This will prevent the "ding" sound

            //Write the rest of your code
        }
    });
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I was facing the same problem. I fixed it by changing the TextBox.Multiline property from false to true.

Hope it helps. Cheers.

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