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I am designing a new database via a new sql file. I am using Oracle SQL Developer and logged in as sysdba.

I would like to know if SQL developer supports or has equivalent command to

connect scott/tiger;

Thank you in advance.

Edit

I am trying to create a foreign key on Schema A table referencing to Schema B table.

The error shown is

[Err] ORA-00942: table or view does not exist

I therefore want to login as "Schema B", grant all permission to SYS user, login as sys again and create the relationship.

Hope I am clearer this time.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As the user SYS you should be able to create the relationship you want by simply prefixing object names with schema owner, as mentioned previously:

ALTR TABLE foo.t1 ADD FOREIGN KEY (col) REFERENCES bar.t2(ID);

That said, you must also grant the REFERENCES privilege to the user foo in order to make this relationship:

GRANT REFERENCES ON bar.t2 TO foo;

The user SYS should be able to do all this. Whether it's a good practice or not is another question.

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1  
Thanks, did the trick. –  Nick Binnet Jun 9 '11 at 15:23

Also remember that if you're trying to create a FK to a table in a different schema & there aren't any synonyms, you have to fully qualify the name:

eg, as the user SCHEMA_A:

ALTER TABLE SCHEMA_A.TABLE_A
add CONSTRAINT fk_TABLE_B
  FOREIGN KEY (COLUMN_A)
  REFERENCES SCHEMA_B.TABLE_B(COLUMN_B);

You mention use of the SYS user - I hope you're not logging in a SYS to do normal development...

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I believe you need to break and re-establish the connection to the database/service in order to log in as a different user in SQL Developer.

However, if you simply want to be in the SCOTT user's name space (so that CREATE TABLE EMP... is executed as CREATE TABLE SCOTT.EMP ..., you can issue

alter session set current_schema = SCOTT;

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1  
Being new to Oracle, I think I have a mistake in the concept itself. I have edited the question to the specific problem I have. –  Nick Binnet Jun 9 '11 at 14:23

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