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I need to define an Interface that redefines something like a hashset.

So I have methods to of the type get(byte key). As I can not use descriptive keys like String I am looking for a generic way to define the keys available within some implementation of the interface. I think of using an enum for that. But is it possible to force the definition of such Enum within the Interface?

To make clear what I mean lets look on an example class implementing the Interface:

public class ByteHashsetImpl implements ByteHashset {
    public enum Key {
        STATE_A,
        STATE_B,
        STATE_C;
    }

    public enum Value {
        VALUE_A,
        VALUE_B,
        VALUE_C;
    }

    public void get(Key k) {
        /**/
    }

}

I want to ensure that each implementation defines and uses its own Enums called Key and Value. This would make it possible to access the key/values using something like ByteHashsetImpl.Key for every implementation of the interface.

Is it possible at all or is there another option beside an informal definition like coding quideline?

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1  
As a complete aside, the naming convention in Java is that classes and interfaces start with a capital letter (so ByteHashset and ByteHashsetImpl). This might sound petty, but it will be misleading to others reading your code if you deviate from this. –  Andrzej Doyle Jun 9 '11 at 11:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't enforce the creation of such enums, but you can force a type argument to be an enum:

public interface Frobnicator<E extends Enum<E>> {
  void frobnicate(E value);
}


enum Bar {
  X, Y;
}

class BarFrobnicator implements Frobnicator<Bar> {
  @Override
  public void frobnicate(Bar value) {
    // do stuff
  }
}

In this case a Frobnicator could simply re-use an existing enum class, but E in Frobnicator will always be an enum type.

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Thank you, that still does not allow me to enforce the definition but on the other hand this might be even better when the implementing classes want to share their enums. Given an instance of such an implementing class, is their a way to reference the used Enum without using reflection for that? –  Alexander May Jun 9 '11 at 12:52
    
This is a technical forum. There is no need for innuendo here. –  KSev Dec 11 '13 at 19:07
1  
@KSev: I'm sorry to disappoint, but if there's any innuendo here, then it's in your mind: frobnicate. –  Joachim Sauer Dec 12 '13 at 9:09

As suggested by Joachim Sauer, you can have Enum type arguments:

public interface MyMap<K extends Enum<K>, V extends Enum<V>> {

    public V get(K key);

}

Then you can have:

public enum StateKeys {

    STATE_A,
    STATE_B,
    STATE_C;

}

and

public enum StateValues {

    VALUE_A,
    VALUE_B,
    VALUE_C;

}

and finally

public class MyStateMap implements MyMap<StateKeys, StateValues> {

    @Override
    public StateValues get(StateKeys key) {
        if (key == StateKeys.STATE_A)
            return StateValues.VALUE_A;
        else if (key == StateKeys.STATE_B)
            return StateValues.VALUE_B;
        else if (key == StateKeys.STATE_C)
            return StateValues.VALUE_C;
        else
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("illegal key " + key);
    }

}
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