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I wonder if compound assignment ^= is atomic in C#. What I really need to do is spin (if the value is 0 then set it to 1 and if it is 1 then set it to 0) an Int32 variable with a single atomic operation.

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For 0 (No/False) or 1 (Yes/True), why use an Int32?! That's exactly what a boolean is for. –  RobinJ Jun 9 '11 at 11:24
    
It's an index in the array. –  bsnote Jun 9 '11 at 11:45

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

As answered above, x^=1 is not atomic. Could you use Interlocked.Increment (which is atomic) and then, when reading, consider the value % 2?

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Gold star for you, Rob! It helps me. –  bsnote Jun 9 '11 at 12:03
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Be careful. "%2" can give you 1, 0 or -1 as an answer. "%2" is not a synonym for reading the bottom bit. If you want to read the bottom bit, read the bottom bit. –  Eric Lippert Jun 9 '11 at 15:01
    
Hadn't considered that. Presumably though, it's not an issue until you overflow. –  Rob Jun 10 '11 at 10:31
    
@EricLippert for completeness: bool isLSBSet = input & 1 == 1; –  Gusdor Feb 28 '12 at 15:23

Operations guaranteed to be atomic are gathered in the Interlocked class. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.interlocked.aspx

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That was my reaction, though it's not immediately obvious to me how to use e.g. CompareExchange to achieve what bsnote wants to do. –  Rob Jun 9 '11 at 11:56

Compound assignments are not atomic. x += 1 for instance is a syntactic sugar for read x from memory, add 1 and write value back to memory.

If you want a good explanation of what is and what is not atomic read Eric Lippert's blog post on the subject: Atomicity, volatitly and immutability are different

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