Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am having a problem in running a backgroundworker on a given specific time .

My code runs the backgoundworker in only one second.

I want to increase the Interval time in my background ,

I am using this line of code to run a background in a button click Event

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

Then in backgroundWorker DoWork,

    private void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        backgroundWorker1.CancelAsync();
    }

At Last in backgroundworker RunWorkCompleted

private void backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender,RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e) { backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync(); }

I want to run the background continously but for every 5 seconds or more than 5.

There would be a great appreciation if someone could help me,

Thanks In Advance

share|improve this question
    
use a timer? I am not sure I understand your question, can you elaborate? – jimplode Jun 9 '11 at 11:57
    
i know to use timer but i want to use background . is there any way to use time Interval in background – G Basha Jun 9 '11 at 11:59
2  
Why do you use CancelAsync in the DoWork() method? – Roy Dictus Jun 9 '11 at 11:59
    
Timers use their own thread anyway, so this will not hold your program, use a timer and then call your background worker from the timer – jimplode Jun 9 '11 at 12:03
    
do mark asnswer as accepted if you got the infomation you want – Pranay Rana Jun 13 '11 at 12:31

Run-time

Timer class represents a Timer control and used to create a Timer at run-time. The following code snippet creates a Timer at run-time, sets its property and event handler.

Timer t = new Timer();   
t.Interval = 2000;    
timer1.Enabled = true;  
timer1.Tick += new System.EventHandler(OnTimerEvent);

The event handler code looks like following.

private void OnTimerEvent(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{
     backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();
}

Here is demo : C# Timer Tutorial

Check documentation on msdn : http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.timers.timer.aspx

share|improve this answer
1  
your answer is good but i am unable to vote u because i have only 10 reputaions sorry – G Basha Jun 9 '11 at 12:07
    
I don't think System.Timers.Timer has a Tick event. Instead use Elapsed. – Dbloom Jul 15 '15 at 23:23

you could add a Timer setting the interval to how often you want the background worker to run and on the timers elapsed event you could start your background worker.

you will want to check that the background worker is not busy before you attempt to start it again though. If this situation occurs then you might consider immediately starting the background worker again when it completes. (if you want it to run at least once every 5 secs)

If you want it to wait 5 seconds after completion, then you need to stop the timer before you start the background worker, then in the background workers completed event you need to reset the timer and start it again.

EDIT

after one of your comments below it seems that you have many backgroundworkers, in which case using one of the other approaches which inserts a delay in the background workers completed event before starting the backgroundworker again is probably a better solution.

You could insert the delay using Thread.Sleep() as has been suggested or you could maybe create a timer in the function and assign a delegate to the timers elapsed event which restarted the background worker. Something along these (untested) lines:

private void backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender,     RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    Timer timer = new Timer();
    timer.Interval = 5000;
    timer.Enabled = true;
    timer.Elapsed+=delegate (object sender, ElapsedEventArgs args)
        {
        backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();        
        };
    timer.Start ();
}
share|improve this answer

Do you need it to run exactly every five seconds or not more often than five seconds? If it's the latter you could call Sleep(5000) on the Thread.CurrentThread just before your BackgroundWorker finishes its DoWork() method.

share|improve this answer
    
your answer is good but i am unable to vote u because i have only 10 reputaions sorry – G Basha Jun 9 '11 at 12:03
    
@G Basha - Thank you..I believe you can vote up at 15 reputation, unless you've used all your votes for the day. – Yuck Jun 9 '11 at 12:05

The easiest solution would be to let the thread sleep for 5 seconds in the beginning of backgroundWorker1_DoWork: Thead.Sleep(5000).

Alternatively, you can set a timer in RunWorkerCompleted that expires in 5 seconds and then starts the BackgroundWorker again.

share|improve this answer
    
your answer is good but i am unable to vote u because i have only 10 reputaions sorry – G Basha Jun 9 '11 at 12:07

If you want to use BW try this:

private void backgroundWorker1_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
{
    Thread.Sleep(5000);//wait for 5s then run it again
    backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();
}
share|improve this answer
    
your answer is good but i am unable to vote u because i have only 10 reputaions sorry – G Basha Jun 9 '11 at 12:06
    
@G Basha - now you can able to vote +1 to question.... – Pranay Rana Jun 9 '11 at 12:11
    
its hanging my application what i should – G Basha Jun 9 '11 at 12:11
    
You welcome, you can do a favor by accepting answers to your other questions. You asked 8 questions and none of them had good answers? – Reniuz Jun 9 '11 at 12:12
    
Move Thread.Sleep(5000); before backgroundWorker1.CancelAsync(); in DoWork method to not hang your app as Yuck mentioned – Reniuz Jun 9 '11 at 12:18

Couldn't you use a Timer to start your BackgroundWorker?

share|improve this answer
    
yes i can but its to long there are more than 20 backgroundworkers in it – G Basha Jun 9 '11 at 12:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.