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feel a bit stupid asking this (sounds as basics) but can't find an answer elsewhere. I want to convert binary data to hex, just that, no fancy formatting and all. hexdump seems too clever, it "overformats" for me. I want to take x bytes from the /dev/random and pass them on as hex.

Preferably I'd like to use only standard linux tools, so that I don't need to install it on every machine (there are many)

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7 Answers 7

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Perhaps use xxd:

% xxd -l 16 -p /dev/random
193f6c54814f0576bc27d51ab39081dc
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great, thanks ! –  davka Jun 9 '11 at 13:20
3  
xxd is part of vim, so it might not always be installed. –  Håkon A. Hjortland Jul 24 '12 at 22:47
    
Note that you can use -c to change the number of bytes per line. Unfortunately you can only set it to 256 after which you need to have some newlines. –  Kevin Cox Nov 12 '13 at 18:27

Watch out!

hexdump and xxd give the results in different endianness!

$ echo -n $'\x12\x34' | xxd -p
1234
$ echo -n $'\x12\x34' | hexdump -e '"%x"'
3412

http://geekandpoke.typepad.com/.a/6a00d8341d3df553ef01543533e604970c-800wi :D

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With od (GNU systems):

$ echo abc | od -A n -v -t x1 | tr -d ' \n'
6162630a

With hexdump (BSD systems):

$ echo abc | hexdump -ve '/1 "%02x"'
6162630a

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hex_dump#od_and_hexdump:
"Depending on your system type, either or both of these two utilities will be available--BSD systems deprecate od for hexdump, GNU systems the reverse."

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After 4 years (not much, I know), most times I read a thread about *nix, I learn about something really old and still completely new for me. +1 for the od, never heard about it, very useful and present even on Cygwin. ;-) –  Charles Roberto Canato Sep 7 '13 at 1:47

Perhaps you could write your own small tool in C, and compile it on-the-fly:

int main (void) {
  unsigned char data[1024];
  size_t numread, i;

  while ((numread = read(0, data, 1024)) > 0) {
    for (i = 0; i < numread; i++) {
      printf("%02x ", data[i]);
    }
  }

  return 0;
}

And then feed it from the standard input:

cat /bin/ls | ./a.out

You can even embed this small C program in a shell script using the heredoc syntax.

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1  
C, for this? That's an overkill. –  user405725 Jun 9 '11 at 12:33
    
Well, but you have full control over the formatting and the behaviour :-) –  Blagovest Buyukliev Jun 9 '11 at 12:34
    
that's always an option, but I was quite sure it's been solved before :) –  davka Jun 9 '11 at 13:26

dd + hexdump will also work:

dd bs=1 count=1 if=/dev/urandom 2>/dev/null  | hexdump -e '"%x"'
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thanks, I started this way but couldn't make hexdump do what I want. I was quite sure that it has the option I need, but couldn't find this in the man page –  davka Jun 9 '11 at 13:24
1  
With this solution (hexdump -e '"%x"'): '\n' -> 'a' (missing leading '0'), 'abcde' -> '6463626165' (incorrect byte order). This could be very bad in non-random-data applications! –  Håkon A. Hjortland Jul 24 '12 at 22:43

If you need a large stream (no newlines) you can use tr and xxd (part of vim) for byte-by-byte conversion.

head -c1024 /dev/urandom | xxd -p | tr -d $'\n'

Or you can use hexdump (posix) for word-by-word conversion.

head -c1024 /dev/urandom | hexdump '-e"%x"'

Note that the difference is endianness.

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If you need a large stream (no newlines) you can use tr and xxd (part of vim) for a byte-by-byte conversion.

head -c1024 /dev/urandom | xxd -p | tr -d $'\n'

Or you can use hexdump (posix) for word-by-word conversion.

head -c1024 /dev/urandom | hexdump '-e"%x"'

Note that the difference is endianness.

Thanks so much that its really work, but i need going to reverse of hex to binary

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