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Sorry if the question is silly. I come from java background.

In the following code, base_list is a parent class of SqlAloc, but what's the meaning of public memory?

class base_list :public memory::SqlAlloc  
{  
protected:  
  list_node *first,**last;  
  uint32_t elements;  
public:
};
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Please remove the **, I spent 5 minutes trying to understand what they were. –  Mr. kbok Jun 9 '11 at 13:18
    
removed, I wanted to highlight it, but looks like it doesn't work –  mysql guy Jun 9 '11 at 13:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Memory is probably a namespace (kind of like an outer class) in which SqlAlloc is defined.

C++ has both public and private inheritance (protected, too, actually.) public inheritance is just like Java inheritance; in private inheritance, though, code outside the derived class doesn't know about the base class. It's a way to inherit implementation without inheriting type. In Java, you can only do both.

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a namespace is not "kind of like an "outer class". Far from it. Its syntactic sugar, not a construct of the language. (and you forgot virtual inheritance) –  rubenvb Jun 9 '11 at 13:13
    
If in Java I define a class A empty except for static inner classes B, C, and D, there are no meaningful differences between A and a C++ namespace, from the perspective of B, C, and D. The class names B, C, and D are scoped inside A, and that's about it. You can come up with little corner cases where the comparison falls down, but that hardly spoils my kind of like an. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 9 '11 at 13:21
    
I always thought that C++ namespaces are kind of like Java packages - but I guess that's just me... –  Nim Jun 9 '11 at 13:25
    
Yeah, a package is a good analogy too, although packages don't contain functions the way namespaces can. Pick your poison. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 9 '11 at 13:30
    
I checked the code, memory is really a namespace. Thanks for your help –  mysql guy Jun 9 '11 at 13:31

memory is either a namespace or a class (struct). public means that all member functions and member data which were declared in SqlAlloc class(struct) as public and protected will be visible in base_list as public and protected.

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base_list is publicly deriving from SqlAlloc which is either a namespace-class, or nested-class, depending upon what memory is - which could be either a namespace or a class.

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