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I have a requirement to serialize a list of objects to a flat file. The calls will be something like:

class MyObject { public int x; public int y; public string a; public string b; }

When I serialize this object, a record should be written in a ascii encoded flat file. Now, the length of field x should be 10 characters (right aligned), field y should be 20 characters (right aligned), fiels a should be 40 (left aligned) and field b should be 100 characters (left aligned). How can I achieve such a thing.

A serialized object should look like :

   25                   8                                     akjsrj                                                                                          jug

I was thinking that may be I can apply custom attributes attributes to the fields and can decide at runtime how to serialize the field..

Regards, Akhilesh

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1  
Have you found a solution? –  jgauffin Jun 14 '11 at 6:11

5 Answers 5

Here is a solution that uses plain old reflection and a custom attribute. It will only serialize/deserialize one item per file, but you could easily add support for multiple items per file.

// Attribute making it possible
public class FlatFileAttribute : Attribute
{
    public int Position { get; set; }
    public int Length { get; set; }
    public Padding Padding { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="FlatFileAttribute"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="position">Each item needs to be ordered so that 
    /// serialization/deserilization works even if the properties 
    /// are reordered in the class.</param>
    /// <param name="length">Total width in the text file</param>
    /// <param name="padding">How to do the padding</param>
    public FlatFileAttribute(int position, int length, Padding padding)
    {
        Position = position;
        Length = length;
        Padding = padding;
    }
}

public enum Padding
{
    Left,
    Right
}


/// <summary>
/// Serializer making the actual work
/// </summary>
public class Serializer
{
    private static IEnumerable<PropertyInfo> GetProperties(Type type)
    {
        var attributeType = typeof(FlatFileAttribute);

        return type
            .GetProperties()
            .Where(prop => prop.GetCustomAttributes(attributeType, false).Any())
            .OrderBy(
                prop =>
                ((FlatFileAttribute)prop.GetCustomAttributes(attributeType, false).First()).
                    Position);
    }
    public static void Serialize(object obj, Stream target)
    {
        var properties = GetProperties(obj.GetType());

        using (var writer = new StreamWriter(target))
        {
            var attributeType = typeof(FlatFileAttribute);
            foreach (var propertyInfo in properties)
            {
                var value = propertyInfo.GetValue(obj, null).ToString();
                var attr = (FlatFileAttribute)propertyInfo.GetCustomAttributes(attributeType, false).First();
                value = attr.Padding == Padding.Left ? value.PadLeft(attr.Length) : value.PadRight(attr.Length);
                writer.Write(value);
            }
            writer.WriteLine();
        }
    }

    public static T Deserialize<T>(Stream source) where T : class, new()
    {
        var properties = GetProperties(typeof(T));
        var obj = new T();
        using (var reader = new StreamReader(source))
        {
            var attributeType = typeof(FlatFileAttribute);
            foreach (var propertyInfo in properties)
            {
                var attr = (FlatFileAttribute)propertyInfo.GetCustomAttributes(attributeType, false).First();
                var buffer = new char[attr.Length];
                reader.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
                var value = new string(buffer).Trim();

                if (propertyInfo.PropertyType != typeof(string))
                    propertyInfo.SetValue(obj, Convert.ChangeType(value, propertyInfo.PropertyType), null);
                else
                    propertyInfo.SetValue(obj, value.Trim(), null);
            }
        }
        return obj;
    }

}

And a small demo:

// Sample class using the attributes
public class MyObject
{
    // First field in the file, total width of 5 chars, pad left
    [FlatFile(1, 5, Padding.Left)]
    public int Age { get; set; }

    // Second field in the file, total width of 40 chars, pad right
    [FlatFile(2, 40, Padding.Right)]
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    // Serialize an object
    using (var stream = File.OpenWrite("C:\\temp.dat"))
    {
        var obj = new MyObject { Age = 10, Name = "Sven" };
        Serializer.Serialize(obj, stream);
    }

    // Deserialzie it from the file
    MyObject readFromFile = null;
    using (var stream = File.OpenRead("C:\\temp.dat"))
    {
        readFromFile = Serializer.Deserialize<MyObject>(stream);
    }

}
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1  
A couple quick notes on this code. You are not using the Position property in deserialization. Also, if you add something to check the existence of the attribute you can optionally supply an attribute to each property of your class. Otherwise, this was awesome and really helped me out. –  Anthony Potts Aug 13 '12 at 15:04
1  
I wrote it directly in the answer just to illustrate how you can do it yourself. I never intended to create a fully working example. –  jgauffin Aug 13 '12 at 18:44
    
I See. Well, it was very close. I'm now trying to figure out what to do when I have a char in my flat file and want to set an Enum in my class accordingly (going from a DB2 mainframe to .NET on SQLServer) –  Anthony Potts Aug 13 '12 at 18:48

Yes, you could achieve this by adding custom attributes and creating your own serializer.

This article gives examples of creating a custom binary serializer.

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/dotnet/CustomSerializationPart2.aspx

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This is flat text format, no need for this, -1 –  Anton Tykhyy Jun 9 '11 at 14:03
3  
Prior to edit of the question, the file format DID look binary. Please reconsider your downvote. –  DaveRead Jun 9 '11 at 14:12

Sorry, I misread your question. I though you were looking for attributes, that would handle the serialization themselves.

Of course, you can create your own attributes and handle your own serialization throught reflection. And if I was doing it, it would be preffered solution. I would preffer it because with attributes:

  • You can specify order of items.
  • You can specify length of field.

As for concrete implementation, simple reflection and string formating would be appropriate.

Old answer: This is quite specific scenario. So I don't believe there are any .NET features, that would make .NET handle it.

But hard-coded serialization and deserialization like this shouldn't be longer than 20 lines of code..

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Is this format fixed? If you have a saying in how to format the output, I would strongly suggest using protobuf-net. It's an incredibly fast library which will use a binary serialization method for your objects with minimal overhead and (I repeat myself) incredible performance. The protocol was invented by google especially for these advantages.

If you cannot change the format, you can create custom attributes and read them out at runtime. But take in mind, that reflection can be a bit slow, depending on your serialization needs. If you only have one type of objects, maybe it's better to provider a special serialization service which writes the properties directly to file.

Link: http://code.google.com/p/protobuf-net/

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1  
This kind of fixed-width formatting is best dealt with using string formatting, printf or String.Format as the case might be. Custom attributes are an overkill unless there are a lot of different classes to format. Protobuf is not appropriate here. –  Anton Tykhyy Jun 9 '11 at 14:04

There are no special serializers for flat files. Use string formatting and manipulation functions, e.g. String.Format ("{0,10}{1,-20}{2,-40}{3,-100}", x, y, a, b) should produce a line formatted according to your format.

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