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I apologize if this is a duplicate, but I couldn't find any concrete examples on the topic in related questions.

After reading Martin Fowler's article on the 'Anemic Domain Model', I'm left wandering as to why is this considered an anti-pattern. Even does the majority of enterprise developers consider it an anti-pattern, since AFAIK probably 90% of the j2ee applications are designed in an 'anemic' way ?

Can someone recommend further reading on the topic (other than the 'Domain Driven Design' book), or even better, give a concrete examples on how this anti-pattern is affecting application design in a bad way.

Thanks,

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3  
I saw this very interesting post by a fellow SO user, which is worth a read: techblog.bozho.net/?p=180. –  planetjones Jun 9 '11 at 14:48
    
@planetjones I have read that and its indeed interesting, its one of the reasons I'm asking this question. Thanks. –  Simeon Jun 9 '11 at 15:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Given the following two classes:

class CalculatorBean  
{  
    //getters and setters  
}  

class CalculatorBeanService  
{  
   Number calculate(Number first, Number second);  
    {  
       //do calculation  
    }  
} 

If I understand correctly, Fowler is stating that because your CalculatorBean is just a bunch of getters/setters you don't gain any real value from it and if you port that object to another system it will do nothing. The problem seems that your CalculatorBeanService contains everything that the CalculatorBean should be responsible for. Which is not the best as now the CalculatorBean delegates all of its responsibility to the CalculatorBeanService

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3  
@Simeon: Not really. Separation of concerns means an object is responsible for just one thing. Models should still be designed this way. Its just that 'anemic domain models' are responsible for nothing at all. –  Kevin Jun 9 '11 at 14:27
2  
@Simeon: Obviously there's some amount of judgement and art involved. The point is ultimately to have code that is easy to read and maintain. To give you a counterpoint: I have a model object called "Job" that happens to be persisted to some store. When I get it out of the store it should be possible to run it. Should that be in a service object or should job simply expose a method run()? I think it's more natural to say job.run() than it is to say jobRunnerService.runJob(job). –  Kevin Jun 9 '11 at 14:50
1  
@Woot4Moo by database code you mean DAOs maybe ? Or stored procedures. I think I'd disagree in both cases. Maybe because of my current mindset but the logic that generates new user names depends on nothing. The logic that finds out whether a username is taken depends on the DB. This is why my current 'feel' is that the logic that generates usernames should be in a service not in a domain object. –  Simeon Jun 9 '11 at 15:06
1  
@Simeon In big-O it isn't the best case scenario that counts its the worst. While it isn't the same as a pattern perse it does show how something that is good in one place is bad in another. –  Woot4Moo Jun 9 '11 at 15:45
1  
@Simeon: I think (my opinion only of course) that what Fowler is railing against is when people follow the 'anemic domain model' pattern across the board, either because they don't know better or as a kind of excuse for not thinking about a good design. –  Kevin Jun 9 '11 at 16:00

For the complete answer take a look at my blog that also contains source code examples [blog]: https://www.link-intersystems.com/blog/2011/10/01/anemic-vs-rich-domain-models/

If you look at the anemic domain model from an object oriented perspective it is definitly an anti-pattern because it is pure procedural programming. The reason why it is called an anti-pattern is that the main object oriented principle is not covered by an anemic domain model:

Object oriented means that: an object manages it's state and gurantees that it is in a legal state at any time. (data hiding, encapsulation)

Therefore an object encapsulates data and manages the access and interpretation of it. In contrast to this an anemic model does not gurantee that it is in a legal state at any time.

An example of an order with order items will help to see the difference. So let's take a look at an anemic model of an order.

An anemic model

 public class Order {
    private BigDecimal total = BigDecimal.ZERO;
    private List<OrderItem> items = new ArrayList<OrderItem>();

    public BigDecimal getTotal() {
        return total;
    }

    public void setTotal(BigDecimal total) {
        this.total = total;
    }

    public List<OrderItem> getItems() {
        return items;
    }

    public void setItems(List<OrderItem> items) {
        this.items = items;
    }
}

public class OrderItem {

    private BigDecimal price = BigDecimal.ZERO;
    private int quantity;
    private String name;

    public BigDecimal getPrice() {
        return price;
    }

    public void setPrice(BigDecimal price) {
        this.price = price;
    }

    public int getQuantity() {
        return quantity;
    }

    public void setQuantity(int quantity) {
        this.quantity = quantity;
    }
}

So where is the logic located that interpretes the order and order items to calculate an order total? This logic is often placed in classes named *Helper, *Util, *Manager or simply *Service. An order service in an anemic model would look like this:

public class OrderService {
    public void calculateTotal(Order order) {
        if (order == null) {
             throw new IllegalArgumentException("order must not be null");
        }

        BigDecimal total = BigDecimal.ZERO;
        List<OrderItem> items = order.getItems();

        for (OrderItem orderItem : items) {
            int quantity = orderItem.getQuantity();
            BigDecimal price = orderItem.getPrice();
            BigDecimal itemTotal = price.multiply(new BigDecimal(quantity));
            total = total.add(itemTotal);
        }
        order.setTotal(total);
    }
}

In an anemic model you invoke a method and pass it the anemic model to bring the anemic model in a legal state. Therefore the anemic model's state management is placed outside the anemic model and this fact makes it an anti-pattern in an object oriented perspective.

The problems with the anemic order model above are:

  • If someone adds an OrderItem to the Order the Order.getTotal() value is incorrect as long as it has not been recalculated by the OrderService. In a real world application it can be cumbersome to find out who added the order item and why the OrderService has not been called. As you might have recognized already the Order also breaks encapsulation of the order items list. Someone can call order.getItems().add(orderItem) to add an order item. That can make it difficut to find the code that really adds the item (order.getItems() reference can be passed through the whole appplication).
  • The OrderService's calculateTotalmethod is responsible to calculate the total for all Order objects. Therefore it must be stateless. But stateless also means that it can not cache the total value and only recalculate it if the Order object changed. So if the calculateTotal method takes a long time you also have a performance issue. Nevertheless you will have performance issues, because clients might not know if the Order is in a legal state or not and therefore preventative call calculateTotal(..) even when it is not needed.

Now take a look at the rich domain model to see the difference.

The rich domain approach

public class Order {

    private BigDecimal total;
    private List<OrderItem> items = new ArrayList<OrderItem>();

    /**
      * The total is defined as the sum of all {@link OrderItem#getTotal()}.
      *
      * @return the total of this {@link Order}.
      */
    public BigDecimal getTotal() {
        if (total == null) {
           /*
            * we have to calculate the total and remember the result
            */
           BigDecimal orderItemTotal = BigDecimal.ZERO;
           List<OrderItem> items = getItems();

           for (OrderItem orderItem : items) {
               BigDecimal itemTotal = orderItem.getTotal();
               /*
                * add the total of an OrderItem to our total.
                */
               orderItemTotal = orderItemTotal.add(itemTotal);
           }

           this.total = orderItemTotal;
           }
        return total;
        }

   /**
    * Adds the {@link OrderItem} to this {@link Order}.
    *
    * @param orderItem
    *            the {@link OrderItem} to add. Must not be null.
    */
    public void addItem(OrderItem orderItem) {
        if (orderItem == null) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("orderItem must not be null");
        }
        if (this.items.add(orderItem)) {
           /*
            * the list of order items changed so we reset the total field to
            * let getTotal re-calculate the total.
            */ 
            this.total = null;
        }
    }

    /**
      *
      * @return the {@link OrderItem} that belong to this {@link Order}. Clients
      *         may not modify the returned {@link List}. Use
      *         {@link #addItem(OrderItem)} instead.
      */
    public List<OrderItem> getItems() {
       /*
        * we wrap our items to prevent clients from manipulating our internal
        * state.
        */
        return Collections.unmodifiableList(items);
    }

}

public class OrderItem {

    private BigDecimal price;

    private int quantity;

    private String name = "no name";

    public OrderItem(BigDecimal price, int quantity, String name) {
     if (price == null) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("price must not be null");
     }
     if (name == null) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("name must not be null");
     }
     if (price.compareTo(BigDecimal.ZERO) < 0) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException(
        "price must be a positive big decimal");
     }
     if (quantity < 1) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("quantity must be 1 or greater");
     }
     this.price = price;
     this.quantity = quantity;
     this.name = name;
    }

    public BigDecimal getPrice() {
     return price;
    }

    public int getQuantity() {
     return quantity;
    }

    public String getName() {
     return name;
    }

    /**
      * The total is defined as the {@link #getPrice()} multiplied with the
      * {@link #getQuantity()}.
      *
      * @return
      */
    public BigDecimal getTotal() {
     int quantity = getQuantity();
      BigDecimal price = getPrice();
      BigDecimal total = price.multiply(new BigDecimal(quantity));
     return total;
    }
}

The rich domain model respects the object oriented principles and gurantees that it is in a legal state at any time.

References

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In case of anemic model, can't you force somehow adding OrderItem's through OrderService? –  hjdm Dec 13 '13 at 8:43
    
@hjdm If you want to force it you first must make the Order's setItems method package scope. Thus you must place it in the same package than the OrderService so that the OrderService can still modify the Order. Nevertheless all other classes in the same package can also modify the Order. So you just reduced the problem area. In this case you try to enforce an object's legal state by convention: "only modify an Order through the OrderService". But how can you be sure that now other class in the same package accesses it and brings it into an illegal state? –  René Link Dec 13 '13 at 9:15
    
You say anemic domain model is procedural, but it can also be done functionally no? –  didibus Feb 20 '14 at 20:34
4  
IMHO this should be marked as the correct answer –  pigiuz Aug 1 '14 at 10:39
    
What you call anaemic domain model is procedural programming with data structures and what you call rich domain model is object oriented programming. Either of them can work according to Clean Code. Now if you want to use domain objects (and not domain data structures) then ofc. you need the rich domain model. –  inf3rno Sep 25 '14 at 22:10

Martin Fowler brings this industry many words and less understanding.

Majority of applications today (web/db) do need many objects that expose their properties.

Any authority (self claimed) frowning upon such practice should lead by example, and show us a successful real world application that's full of embodiments of his marvelous principles.

Or else shut up. It is sickening that there so many hot airs in our industry. This is engineering, not a drama club.

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8  
I'd give this +1000 voteups if I could. This is exactly my view. If you criticize something give examples :) This is also exactly the reason why I'm asking the question. –  Simeon Jun 9 '11 at 15:33
7  
This should probably be a comment –  Woot4Moo Jun 9 '11 at 15:46
2  
@Woot4Moo an answer stating, there are no examples is a valid opinion IMO. –  Simeon Jun 9 '11 at 19:49
6  
@Simeon I was purely commenting that the answer would have been better served as a comment because it adds nothing to the discussion beyond someone's opinion. –  Woot4Moo Jun 9 '11 at 20:39
2  
Boom! Now that's an answer I love. I've spent a lot of time researching allegedly all-encompassing architectural concepts. The potential advantages are typically obvious and clear. What I'm really hoping to learn is "what are the disadvantages"? With that information I could weigh whether or not the solution is a good choice for my situation. In this case, "Anemic Domain Model" is simply a pejorative for a valid option with disadvantages that should be considered. –  Johnny Kauffman Jan 22 '14 at 16:30

Well. You're right that almost all java code is written this way. The reason it's an anti pattern is that one of the main principles of object oriented design is to combine data and the functions that operate on it into a single object. For example when I was writing old school c code, we would mimic object oriented design like this:

struct SomeStruct {
    int x;
    float y;
};

void some_op_i(SomeStruct* s, int x) {
    // do something
}
void some_op_f(SomeStruct* s, float y) {
    // something else
}

Which is to say that the language didn't allow us to combine the functions to operate on SomeStruct inside of the struct, so we created a group of free functions that by convention took SomeStruct as a first param.

When c++ came along, the struct became a class, and it allows you to put functions into the struct (class). Then the struct is implicitly passed as the this pointer, so instead of creating a struct and passing it to functions, you create the class and call methods against it. The code is more clear and easier to understand this way.

Then I moved to the java world, and everyone separates the model from the service, which is to say the model is a glorified struct, and the service, being stateless as it is, becomes a collection of functions that operates on a model. Which to me, sounds suspiciously like a c language idiom. It's pretty funny because in c it was done because the language didn't offer anything better, and in java it's done because the programmers don't know any better.

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interesting comparison :) I'll think about this a little bit. –  Simeon Jun 9 '11 at 14:29
    
I don't think this is an accurate answer. You can have data structures in an OO code too. There is nothing wrong with that, for example a DTO like domain event or command is a data structure as well. By definition domain objects like entities, value objects, etc... have behavior, so they should not be data structures... But I am still looking for that definition :D –  inf3rno Sep 25 '14 at 22:20

As with most things in the software development world there is not black and white. There are cases where an anemic domain model is the perfect fit.

BUT there are a lot of cases where developers try to build a domain model, aka do DDD, and end up with an anemic domain mode instead. I think in this case the anemic domain model is considered an anti-patern.

Just make sure you use the best tool for the job and if it works for you don't bother changing it.

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