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I have a page with 100 boxes stacked on top of each other, in a teetering stack. I want to simulate this teetering with some jQuery animation having them sway back and forth in a ripple effect.

I first tried this:

$("#teetering-tester").click(function () {
    $("#box-stack div").each(function (id) {
        $(this).animate({ 'margin-right': "+=3px" }, 300 + id, function () {
            $(this).animate({ 'margin-right': "-=3px" }, 300 + id);
        });
    });
    return false;
});

But this makes the entire stack move to the right, and then move to the right.

I was hoping for a ripple effect. So, I tried to open new threads with setTimeout():

$("#doTeeter").click(function () {
    $("#output").append("<li>Starting</li>");
    $("#box-stack div").each(function (id) {
        setTimeout($(this).animate({ 'margin-right': "+=3px" }, 300 + id, function () {
            $(this).animate({ 'margin-right': "-=3px" }, 300 + id);
        }), 700, function () {
            $("#output").append("<li>I'm done</li>");
        });
    });
    return false;
});

Same thing- entire stacks moves in unison.

I then tried:

$("#doTeeter").click(function () {
    $("#box-stack div").each(function (id) {
        setTimeout(teeterStack(id), 700);
    });
    return false;
});

... 

function teeterStack(id) {
    $("#box-stack div").eq(id)
        .animate({ 'margin-right': "+=3px" }, 500 + id, function () {
            $(this).animate({ 'margin-right': "-=3px" }, 300 + id);
        });
    });
}

but they all still move together.

How can I make a ripple effect across my 100 boxes?

Any help will be appreciated.

Thanks, Scott

Update

Oh, I just noticed that I'd tried to add some variability by making the animation duration be a function of 300ms plus the id of the item.

Update 2

I just tried this, and it kinda works, but is a bit herky-jerky:

function teeterStack(id) {
    $("#box-stack div").eq(id)
        .animate({ 'margin-right': "+=3px" }, getTime(id), function () {
            $(this).animate({ 'margin-right': "-=3px" }, getTime(id));
        });
}
function getTime(id) {
    var min = 300, max = 2000, step = (max-min)/100;
    return (step*id) + min;
}

But I didn't know about delay() so I'm going to give that a shot.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The trick is to delay the start of effect based on the elements index. Here's an untested poke at it. NOTE: using your first example.

$("#teetering-tester").click(function () {
    $("#box-stack div").each(function (id) {

        var stallFor = 300 * parseInt(id); // 300 is the gap between delays, tweek it based on visual preference

        $(this).delay(stallFor).animate({ 'margin-right': "+=3px" }, function () {
            $(this).animate({ 'margin-right': "-=3px" });
        });
    });
    return false;
});

Suggestion

I'd use index instead of id. It's confusing as to what the variable represents.

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I think you have the right idea with setTimeout, but the problem is that you're using the same value for the timeout time. Provide a random (or semi random) value for the second argument of the setTimeout function to get the effect you want. Assuming the IDs are sequential numbers, I'd suggest something like setTimeout(teeterStack(id), 700+(id*100));

Note: I haven't tested this...

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