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I want to use C# to build a custom-made scripting language. It will have simple statements which are in fact method calls with arguments like:

Set("C1", 63);
Wait(1.5);
Incr("C1", 1);

Now, I want to provide also a loop and the usual C# syntax with the indexer is too complicated for such a simple thing. For example I would have this to loop 20 times:

for (20)
{
  Wait(1.5);
  Incr("C1", 1);      
}

Is there some way to achieve such a simple loop at least closely? (e.g. a wrapped method call inside the for statement or the like)

Thanks, Marcel

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for(20), which I would rather call repeat(20), would be equivalent in C# with for(int i = 0; i < 20; ++i). I don't understand what is the actual problem. –  Marius Bancila Jun 9 '11 at 14:57
    
My problem is, that I feel the standard for statement too complicated for my scripting language. In fact id encapsulates 3 statements with a lot of special characters, to express something that could be told with a single number. My users will be non-programmers. –  Marcel Jun 10 '11 at 6:58
    
In the end, I used IronPython. Not exactly a very simple language, but more known to my users, and still reasonably simple. –  Marcel Jul 25 '11 at 19:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

create a function extending ints:

public static class Extensions {

    public static void Times(this int n, Action action) {
        if (action != null)
            for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
                action();
    }

}

call it like:

20.Times(() => {
    Wait(1.5);
    Incr("C1", 1);
});
share|improve this answer
    
I'll accept that because it is short in code and quite elegant. –  Marcel Jun 10 '11 at 7:07

You can do it with delegates and lambda expressions.

For(20, () => 
    { 
        Wait(1.5); 
        Incr("C1", 1); 
    } );

private void For (int count, Action action)
{
    while (count-- > 0)
        action();
}
share|improve this answer
 public static class Loop{
     public static void For(int iterations, Action actionDelegate){       
         for (int i = 1; i <= iterations; i++) actionDelegate();
     }
 }

Example:

class ForLoopTest 
{
    static void Main() 
    {
       Loop.For(20, () => { Wait(1.5); Incr("C1",1); }); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Let us understand, a script code like this:

Declare("myVar", "integer");
Set("myVar", "5");

For("myVar"){Say("Hello");}

Will be interpreted like something like this:

public class MyScriptInterpreter
{

  // ...

  protected void forLoop(List<String> Params; List<String> Block)
  {
    int HowManyTimes = Convert.ToInt16(Params[0]);

    for (int k=1; k == HowManyTimes; k++) 
    {
       interpretBlock(Block);
    } 
  }


  protected void interpretBlock(List<String> Block)
  {
    foreach(String eachInstruction in Block)
    {
       interpret(eachInstruction);
    }
  }

  protected void interpret
     (String Instruction, List<String> Params; MyDelegateType MyDelegate)
  {
    if (Instruction == "declare")
    {
      this.declare(Params);
    }
    else if (Instruction == "set")
    {
      this.set(Params);
    }
    else if (Instruction == "for")
    {
      this.forLoop(Params, MyDelegate);
    }
  }
} // class

So, the block of the for, becomes a list of instructions, maybe strings.

Anyway, as an additional answer, I suggest to think to add, in the future, functions (procedures, subroutines) and namespaces (modules) to your language, as a required syntax.

I know that its a little difficult to implement. But, I have seen a lot of script languages that eventually, are use from small code snippets to full applications, and the lack of functions or namespaces make a mess.

ScriptBegin("FiveTimes");
   Declare("myVar", "integer");
   Set("myVar", "5");

   For("myVar"){Say("Hello");}
ScriptEnd();

PHP its a good example of this problem. Started, just like your script, for quick small applications. Eventually, functions and namespace where added.

Good Luck with your project.

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