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I have a construction similar to this (but a lot more complicated):

var list = new List<string>();

// .. populate list ..

foreach(var item in list)
{
    DoFunction(list);
}

public void DoFunction(List<string> list)
{
    if(someCondition == true)
    {
        // .. modify list in here ..
    }
}

Now, I understand that its not possible to edit the collection you're foreaching through, but how do you jump out of the loop gracefully if you do have to edit the list (without a try catch statement)? Is there some way to tell if the list has been edited? Can you edit the list and quickly break; before it notices?

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IIRC it will throw a concurrent modification exception. –  Woot4Moo Jun 9 '11 at 15:06
    
Whats the problem with exiting from the loop if some condition occurs and editting the list after that? –  Abdul Muqtadir Jun 9 '11 at 15:06
    
    
You could List.Where(somecondition).ToList().Foreach(List.Remove(thisitem)), only for small lists though... not efficient for larger ones. –  FlyingStreudel Jun 9 '11 at 15:07
    
@Abdul Because the loop has no idea about the condition. It's all done in DoFunction() –  TheAdamGaskins Jun 9 '11 at 15:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Rather than use a foreach construct, a for loop would allow you to alter the list.

for (var x = 0; x < list.Count; x++) {

}
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2  
This can get really tricky, depending on which modifications are made to the original list. If you remove items that you find while traversing the list, you have to modify the x value appropriately to avoid errors. –  StriplingWarrior Jun 9 '11 at 15:14
1  
@StriplingWarrior it isn't that hard. Just do x-- and you're fine after deleting –  Oskar Kjellin Jun 9 '11 at 15:15
1  
I depends on how complicated his DoFunction is. If he's removing other items from the list (besides the item at x), then he'll have to determine whether those items come before or after the current position. I'm not saying it can't be done--it just becomes complex enough that it's not worth it in many cases. –  StriplingWarrior Jun 9 '11 at 15:26
    
DoFunction is very complicated actually... but at the most it will only remove one element, so this works perfectly :) –  TheAdamGaskins Jun 9 '11 at 16:12

Yes, you could break, if that's what you really want. An exception won't be thrown until the for loop tries to grab the next item from the list.

But I've found it's easiest just to create and iterate across a copy of the list so you don't have to worry about it.

foreach(var item in list.ToList())

The added performance overhead of an extra, untouched list is generally negligible compared to the maintainability costs of more complex code.

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But not "edit the list and quickly break; before it notices" –  Wonko the Sane Jun 9 '11 at 15:07
    
Doesn't that present the same problem? if list changes, then wouldn't list.ToList() change too? –  TheAdamGaskins Jun 9 '11 at 15:09
2  
@TheAdamGaskins: No, list.ToList() gets evaluated once at the beginning of the for loop, and just creates a direct copy of the original list. That copy is used for the sake of iteration, whereas the original list is the one with items being added and removed. –  StriplingWarrior Jun 9 '11 at 15:12
1  
@TheAdamGaskins: No, because list.ToList() will be evaluated and a new list created. The enumerator will enumerate the new list, leaving the original list available for modification. –  Jim Mischel Jun 9 '11 at 15:12

It's hard to offer useful advice without knowing what kinds of edits are being made. The pattern that I've found is has the most general-purpose value, though, to just construct a new list.

For example, if you need to look at each item and decide between removing it, leaving it as-is, or inserting items after it, you could use a pattern like this:

IEnumerable<string> butcherTheList(IEnumerable<string> input)
{
    foreach (string current in input)
    {
        if(case1(current))  
        {
            yield return current;
        }
        else if(case2(current))
        {
            yield return current;
            yield return someFunc(current);
        }
        // default behavior is to yield nothing, effectively removing the item
    }
}

List<string> newList = butcherTheList(input).ToList();
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