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Hi I would like to set and forget two fields for tracking the date the record was added and also the date the record was last modified in a mySQL database.

I am using "ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP" and was hoping I would just change UPDATE to INSERT.

No luck however. Can anyone give me the heads up on the best way to achieve this? - preferably inside the database itself.

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4 Answers

This assumes MySQL 5. Simply add two triggers:

create table foo (a1 INT, created datetime, updated datetime) engine=innodb;

DELIMITER |

CREATE TRIGGER foo_created BEFORE INSERT ON foo
FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
SET new.created := now();
SET new.updated := now();
END;

|

CREATE TRIGGER foo_updated BEFORE UPDATE ON foo
FOR EACH ROW BEGIN
SET new.updated := now();
END;
|

DELIMITER     ;

insert into foo (a1) values(7);
select * from foo;

update foo set a1=9;
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mySQL has a NOW() function you can use, see the tutorial at Tutorials Point that can help you put it in place.

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You basically need both columns to be setup as timestamps with default values of CURRENT_TIMESTAMP. Unfortunately, this is not allowed in MySQL:

Error Code: 1293
Incorrect table definition; there can be only one TIMESTAMP column with CURRENT_TIMESTAMP in DEFAULT or ON UPDATE clause

You can't have two timestamp columns, even though you need one to only have a default value of CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, and the other one to be UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, this is still not allowed.

Your best bet here would be to specify as so:

CREATE TABLE `test` (
`addedDate` dateTime,
`lastModified` timestamp on update CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
)

Unfortunately, you'll have to set the 'addedDate' manually on insert using the NOW() function.

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Thanks - that's what I thought. It would be nice to not have to. Anyhow thanks for clarifying. –  Chin Jun 9 '11 at 16:11
    
Glad it helped clarify. Can you mark this as the answer? –  landoncz Jun 27 '11 at 18:12
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You could add a DATETIME column and set it when you create the row of data. That will serve as the date the record was added.

Next, add a TIMESTAMP column:

Automatic updating of the first TIMESTAMP column in a table occurs under any of the following conditions:

  • You explicitly set the column to NULL.

  • The column is not specified explicitly in an INSERT or LOAD DATA INFILE statement.

  • The column is not specified explicitly in an UPDATE statement and some other column changes value. An UPDATE that sets a column to the value it does not cause the TIMESTAMP column to be updated; if you set a column to its current value, MySQL ignores the update for efficiency.

The TIMESTAMP column will take care of your record modified date.

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