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I'm still working on my ScalaTest FeatureSpec DSL.

I'd like 3 variants of my given function. All take tokens: Any, and then either

A. A block block: => Unit that is executed later

given("user visits", the[AdminHomePage]) {
    // just code 
}

B. A block block: Any => Unit that is executed later with the tokens

given("user visits", the[AdminHomePage]) { 
  x: Any => x match { 
    case ("user visits", pageClass:Class[Page]) => 
      startPage(pageClass)
  }
}

C. No block, where the tokens are processed by another function

given("user visits", the[AdminHomePage])

Now when I define all three methods

def given(tokens: Any) = ...
def given(tokens: Any)(block: Any => Unit) = block(tokens)
def given(tokens: Any)(block: => Unit) = block

The compiler considers them ambiguous.

ambiguous reference to overloaded definition, both method given in trait GivenWhenThenFeatureSpec of type (tokens: Any)(block: => Unit)Unit and  method given in trait GivenWhenThenFeatureSpec of type (tokens: Any)(block: (Any) => Unit)Unit match argument types

How can disambiguate, or write a single method that can differentiate between the block (or lack of)?

share|improve this question
    
Do you mean to write tokens: Any* or am I missing something? –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Jun 9 '11 at 16:29
    
Ah yes, or rather no. It is tokens: Any and the arguments are packaged up as a tuple that I match on (a-la B above). –  Duncan McGregor Jun 9 '11 at 16:36
    
So the final processing of the DSL is a method with a match on the tuple and many cases, fired by the first (non-block) form. The block forms are there to let me prototype the implementations of the cases. –  Duncan McGregor Jun 9 '11 at 16:39
    
Is the (C) case one that the tokens are processed immediately or later? –  Mitch Blevins Jun 9 '11 at 17:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I like @MachAndy's solution above, except for the importing of the unit2emptyfunction conversions, which I see as possibly interfering or covering other type errors.

If instead you define the following:

object Given {
  trait Processor {
    def process(tokens: Any) 
  }
  class ProcessorA(block: =>Unit) extends Processor {
    def process(tokens: Any) = {
      block  // execute or store block for later, ignoring tokens
    }
  }
  class ProcessorB(block: Any=>Unit) extends Processor {
    def process(tokens: Any) = {
      block(tokens) // or store block for later execution
    }
  }
  class ProcessorC extends Processor {
    def process(tokens: Any) = {
      // do something defaultish with the tokens
    }
  }

  implicit def blockToProcessorA(block: =>Unit) = new ProcessorA(block)
  implicit def blockToProcessorB(block: Any=>Unit) = new ProcessorB(block)
  implicit val processorC = new ProcessorC

  def given(tokens: Any)(implicit p: Processor) = p.process(tokens)
}

Then, you can simply:

import Given._

given("user visits", the[AdminHomePage])
given("user visits", the[AdminHomePage]) {
  // some stuff that ignores tokens
}
given("user visits", the[AdminHomePage]) { x: Any =>
  x match {
    // do something that looks at the tokens
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works very well so far, with the small complication that I have had to declare all the blocks as => Any in order to allow the block content to evaluate to something (which is discarded). Thank you. –  Duncan McGregor Jun 9 '11 at 22:52
    
Oh and another tiny enhancement was that implicit object ProcessorC allowed me to delete the implicit val. –  Duncan McGregor Jun 9 '11 at 23:02
    
That was the kind of enhancement I was looking for ! Thank you very much for this solution. –  Mach Andy Jun 10 '11 at 7:52

I have here a solution but I think it can be enhanced.

I used a single given method as entry and implicit to provide or not a body

def given[A](tokens: A)(implicit block: A => Unit) {
    block(tokens)
}

First here is a sugar to be able use a Unit block as a Any => Unit

implicit def unit2emptyfunction(body: Unit): Any => Unit = {
    case _ => body
}

To be able to work in the C case, I provide a default body to fill the block parameter that does nothing.

implicit val doNothing: Any => Unit = { }

Now you can use it in this way :

/*
 * A case, block is implicitly converted into a A => Unit 
 * although it doesn't use the argument
 */
given("user visits", the[AdminHomePage]) {
    // just code
}


/*
 * B case, block is fully provided and thus not implicitly converted
 */ 
given("user visits", the[AdminHomePage]) {
  case ("user visits", pageClass: Class[Page]) => 
      startPage(pageClass)
}

// C case, block implicitly provided by doNothing implicit val
given("user visits", the[AdminHomePage])
share|improve this answer
    
I'm also nervous of the implicits, so am going with Mitch's answer, but thank you for showing that it was possible, as it has let me write some tests knowing that I will be able to parse them. –  Duncan McGregor Jun 9 '11 at 22:54

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