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I need to calculate changes off of time series of nullable numbers. The following code gets the job done:

public static double?[] GetChanges(double?[] x)
{
    if(x.Length == 1)
        throw new Exception("Time Series Too Short");
    var ret = new double?[x.Length - 1];
    for (int i = 1; i < x.Length; i++)
    {
        ret[i-1] = (x[i - 1].HasValue && x[i].HasValue) ? x[i] - x[i - 1] : null;
    }
    return ret;
}

Is there a better way to accomplish that with Linq? The library is using .Net 3.5. Right now I cannot use Zip, because that comes with .Net 4.

Edit: following the advice by mquander and Eric Lippert, I have come up with the following code which runs on 3.5:

public class Tuple<T>
{
    public Tuple(T first)
    {
        First = first;
    }

    public T First { get; set; }
}

public class Tuple<T, T2> : Tuple<T>
{
    public Tuple(T first, T2 second)
        : base(first)
    {
        Second = second;
    }

    public T2 Second { get; set; }

    public static Tuple<T1, T2> New<T1, T2>(T1 t1, T2 t2)
    {
        return new Tuple<T1, T2>(t1, t2);
    }
}

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<Tuple<T, T>> Pairs<T>(this IEnumerable<T> seq)
    {
        using (var enumerator = seq.GetEnumerator())
        {
            enumerator.MoveNext();
            var prior = enumerator.Current;

            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                yield return Tuple<T, T>.New(prior, enumerator.Current);
                prior = enumerator.Current;
            }
        }
    }
}

I am using this code as follows:

    public static IEnumerable<double?> GetChanges2(double?[] x)
    {
        if (x.Length == 1)
            throw new Exception("Time Series Too Short");
        return x.Pairs().Select(p => p.Second - p.First);
    }

Any suggestions on further improvement are welcome. I will be back when I have VS2010 and .Net 4, so that I can try out the approaches suggested in both answers.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
I am confused by this code, specifically by the body of the loop. What purpose does the conditional operator achieve? Why is the body of the loop not simply "ret[i-1] = x[i]-x[i-1];" ??? –  Eric Lippert Jun 9 '11 at 18:10
    
Oh, I didn't personally know that you could subtract nullable numeric types and have it handle nulls correctly. Awesome. –  mquander Jun 9 '11 at 18:15
1  
@mquander: yep, that's the whole point of nullable arithmetic. We automatically "lift" the operations to nullable. Where it breaks down, unfortunately, is in comparisons. In C#, when you compare a null double equal to another null double the result should be null. "null" means "I don't know", and the answer to "does one thing I don't know equal another thing I don't know" is not "true", is not "false", is "I don't know!" But comparisons always produce bools, not nullable bools. VB gets it right; in VB equality is three-valued. –  Eric Lippert Jun 9 '11 at 18:23
    
@Eric: I did not know that x[i] - x[i - 1] already handles nulls for me. Nice tip! –  Arne Lund Jun 9 '11 at 18:27
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Another idea (inspired by this answer) would be to keep the previous item in a captured variable:

static IEnumerable<double?> GetChanges(IEnumerable<double?> x)
{
    double? previous = x.First();
    return x.Skip(1).Select(d =>
              { double? result = d - previous; previous = d; return result; });
}

This must work because the captured variable is "hidden" in the function.

share|improve this answer
    
this thing does work on 3.5. IMO it is short and elegant. Thanks! –  Arne Lund Jun 10 '11 at 17:23
    
@Arne: you're welcome! –  Vlad Jun 10 '11 at 19:31
add comment

Maybe just

Enumerable.Zip(
    x.Skip(1),
    x,
    (a, b) => (a.HasValue && b.HasValue) ? (a - b) : null)
)

?

By the way, I would use just doubles and double.NaN instead of nulls. This way the code can be simplified to just

Enumerable.Zip(x.Skip(1), x, (a, b) => a - b)

in this and perhaps some other places.

EDIT:
Following @Eric Lippert's advice, removing null checks is possible even for Nullable case. So the answer would be simply

Enumerable.Zip(x.Skip(1), x, (a, b) => a - b)

even in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
You probably want to reverse the x.Skip(1) and x arguments if you want to take this approach. –  mquander Jun 9 '11 at 17:33
    
@mquander: indeed, thanks! I've corrected the answer. –  Vlad Jun 9 '11 at 17:34
    
@Vlad: According to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd267698.aspx I need .Net 4 to use it. I am still on .Net 3.5. I know I should upgrade ASAP. Thanks! –  Arne Lund Jun 9 '11 at 18:05
1  
The "hasvalues" are unnecessary regardless. Arithmetic on nullables is already lifted. –  Eric Lippert Jun 9 '11 at 18:11
2  
@Vlad: OK, you got it. I'll go back in time a couple of weeks and have Bill Wagner write an article on that... and now back to the future again, and done. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vcsharp/hh124568 –  Eric Lippert Jun 9 '11 at 18:58
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Not really. I would do it your way. If you're feeling particularly functional, the way to go would be to define a Pairs method on IEnumerable<T> that breaks a sequence into a series of consecutive overlapping pairs, and then map each pair to the delta between its first and second value.

EDIT since an example was requested:

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<Tuple<T, T>> Pairs<T>(this IEnumerable<T> seq)
    {
        using (var enumerator = seq.GetEnumerator())
        {
            enumerator.MoveNext();
            var prior = enumerator.Current;

            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                yield return Tuple.Create(prior, enumerator.Current);
                prior = enumerator.Current;
            }
        }
    }
}

Then GetChanges is reduced to:

var changes = values.Pairs().Select(x => x.Item2 - x.Item1);

(Note that my implementation returns an empty sequence instead of throwing an exception if values contains less than two values.)

(edit again -- cleaned up the nullable type handling at the end, thanks Eric for pointing it out!)

share|improve this answer
    
For posterity, the main reason I prefer this over Vlad's version using Zip is that Vlad enumerates the sequence twice, whereas you could properly write Pairs to only enumerate the sequence once. –  mquander Jun 9 '11 at 17:36
    
@mquander: you are right, but I expect a really good optimizer to be able to cope with this. Not sure if the current C# versions are good enough. –  Vlad Jun 9 '11 at 17:42
    
@mquander: I am not following you (yet), can you give me a more detailed answer? –  Arne Lund Jun 9 '11 at 17:48
    
OK, just a moment. –  mquander Jun 9 '11 at 17:50
    
@Vlad: I would bet my life that no C# optimizer which will ever exist could manage that. It would have to know quite a lot about the implementation of both Skip and Zip to know that the optimization was correct, as well as knowing that enumerating this particular sequence has no side effects. –  mquander Jun 9 '11 at 18:03
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