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We have a legacy database with some (older) columns using "SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS" and more recent changes have used "Latin1_General_CI_AS".

This is a pain as joins need the additional COLLATE statement to work.

I'd like to bring everything up to "Latin1_General_CI_AS". From what I can gather they are more or less identical collations and I won't lose data during this process...

Does anyone know if this is the case?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is more info on this MSDN forum:

http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/sqlgetstarted/thread/196b4586-1338-434d-ba8c-49fa3c9bdeeb/

Which states:

You should see little difference if the collation is SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS or Latin1_General_CI_AS, but both have instances where they are faster or slower than the other.

Latin1_General_CI_AS :- Latin1-General, case-insensitive, accent- sensitive, kanatype-insensitive, width-insensitive

SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS:- Latin1-General, case-insensitive, accent-sensitive, kanatype-insensitive, width-insensitive for Unicode Data, SQL Server Sort Order 52 on Code Page 1252 for non-Unicode Data

Therefore in my opinion you shouldn't see a difference, especially if your data is only a-z0-9

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SELECT * FROM ::fn_helpcollations()
WHERE name IN (
'SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS',
'Latin1_General_CI_AS'
)

...gives...

Latin1_General_CI_AS: Latin1-General, case-insensitive, accent-sensitive, kanatype-insensitive, width-insensitive

SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS: Latin1-General, case-insensitive, accent-sensitive, kanatype-insensitive, width-insensitive for Unicode Data, SQL Server Sort Order 52 on Code Page 1252 for non-Unicode Data

So from this, I would infer that the code page used is the same (Latin1-General => 1252), so you should encounter no loss of data - if anything were to change post-conversion it might be the sort order - which is probably immaterial.

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Here is a more complete answer:

http://www.olcot.co.uk/sql-blogs/revised-difference-between-collation-sql_latin1_general_cp1_ci_as-and-latin1_general_ci_as

The key difference between these collations is in how they apply character expansion rules. Certain Latin characters may be expanded into multiple characters. The SQL_xxxx collations may ignore these character expansions when working with non-unicode text, but apply them for unicode text. As a result: joins, sorts, and comparisons may return different results when using one collation versus the other.

Example:

Under Latin1_General_CI_AS these two statements return the same set of records, as ß is expanded to ss.

SELECT * FROM MyTable3 WHERE Comments = 'strasse'
SELECT * FROM MyTable3 WHERE Comments = 'straße'

When using SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS the above statements return different records, since the ß is treated as a different character than ss.

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