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I have a C++ program, called C, that is designed to shut down when it receives a SIGINT signal. I've written a Python program P that runs C as a subprocess. I want P to stop C. I tried 3 things and I'd like to know why some of them didn't work.

Attempt #1:

import subprocess
import signal
import os

p = subprocess.Popen(...)
...
os.killpg(p.pid, signal.SIGINT)

This code gives me the error

OSError [Errno 3]: No such process`

even though the p.pid matches the pid displayed by ps.

Attempt #2:

import subprocess
import signal
import os

p = subprocess.Popen(...)
...
os.system('kill -SIGINT %u' % p.pid)

This gives me the error

sh: kill: bad signal`

even though kill -SIGINT <pid> works from the terminal.

Attempt #3:

import subprocess
import signal
import os

p = subprocess.Popen(...)
...
os.system('kill -2 %u' % p.pid)

This works.

My question is, why didn't #1 and #2 work?


Edit: my original assumption was that since the documentation for os.kill() says New in version 2.7: Windows support, I thought that os.kill() is (a) first available in 2.7 and (b) works in Windows. After reading the answers below, I ran os.kill() on Solaris, which I should have done in the first place sorry, and it does work in 2.4. Obviously, the documentation means that Windows support is new in 2.7. Opps.

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The first fails because os.killpg kills a process group, identified by its leader; you have a simple process, not a process group. Try os.kill instead. The second fails because the shell builtin kill understands symbolic signals, but the external command on Solaris doesn't (whereas on *BSD and Linux it does); use a numeric signal (SIGINT is 2 on Solaris, or use Python's predefined signal constants from the signal module). That said, use Popen's own interface instead as mentioned by someone else; don't reinvent the wheel, you're liable to create some corners.

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Thanks for the explanation! –  jok3rnaut Jun 9 '11 at 18:37
    
The /usr/bin/kill external command on Solaris accepts symbolic names without the SIG prefix, so kill -INT should work. –  alanc Aug 30 '11 at 18:31
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The Popen object has a kill() method that you can invoke as well as a terminate() method and a generic send_signal() method.

I would use one of these rather than trying any of the out of band stuff you'd use with the os interface. You've already got a handle to the process, you should use it!

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Unfortunately, I'm using python 2.4 and all of those features were only added in python 2.6. –  jok3rnaut Jun 9 '11 at 18:47
    
I just realized that when I rewrote the question, I accidentally removed the version information. Sorry for the lack of clarity! –  jok3rnaut Jun 9 '11 at 18:51
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