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I found a problem with exec (It happened in a system that has to be extensible with user written scripts). I could reduce the problem itself to this code:

def fn():
    context = {}
    exec '''
class test:
    def __init__(self):
        self.buf = '1'*1024*1024*200
x = test()''' in context

fn()

I expected that memory should be freed by the garbage collector after the call of function fn. However, the Python process still consumes the additional 200MB of memory and I have absolutely no clue what is happening here and how to release the allocated memory manually.

I suspect that defining a class inside exec is not a very bright idea, but, first of all, I want to understand what is going wrong in the example above.

It looks like wrapping class instance creation in another function solves the problem but what is the difference?

def fn():
    context = {}
    exec '''
class test:
    def __init__(self):
        self.buf = '1'*1024*1024*200
def f1(): x = test()
f1()
    ''' in context
fn()

This is my Python interpreter version:

$ python
Python 2.7 (r27:82500, Sep 16 2010, 18:02:00) 
[GCC 4.5.1 20100907 (Red Hat 4.5.1-3)] on linux2
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Does doing the same thing in your code (without going through a string and exec) give the same results? –  delnan Jun 9 '11 at 18:02
3  
gc.collect() seems to solve it. There must be a cyclic loop somewhere. Guessing wildly, x has a reference to its class, the class probably has a reference to the namespace its defined in, and that in turn has a reference back to x. –  Thomas K Jun 9 '11 at 18:04
    
Same thing in my code without exec goes well, and garbage collector works as expected. –  3xter Jun 9 '11 at 18:07
    
Try upgrading to 2.7.1? Maybe that solves it. –  Pwnna Jun 9 '11 at 18:46
    
This is more about understanding deeper what is going on to be aware of what worse could happen. The workaround I posted solved this particular issue in the example and in my code. No success with 2.7.1. –  3xter Jun 9 '11 at 18:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The reason that you're seeing it take up 200Mb of memory for longer than you expect is because you have a reference cycle: context is a dict referencing both x and test. x references an instance of test, which references test. test has a dict of attributes, test.__dict__, which contains the __init__ function for the class. The __init__ function in turn references the globals that it was defined with -- which is the dict you passed to exec, context.

Python will break these reference cycles for you (since nothing involved has a __del__ method) but it requires gc.collect() to run. gc.collect() will run automatically every N allocations (determined by gc.set_threshold()) so the "leak" will go away at some point, but if you want it to go away immediately you can run gc.collect() yourself, or break the reference cycle yourself before exiting the function. You can easily do the latter by calling context.clear() -- but you should realize that that affects all instances of the class you created in it.

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I don't think the problem has to do with exec - the garbage collector just isn't activating. If you extract the exec'd code out into the main application, both ways give the same behavior as with exec:

class test:
    def __init__(self):
        self.buf = '1'*1024*1024*200
x = test()

# Consumes 200MB

class test:
    def __init__(self):
        self.buf = '1'*1024*1024*200
def f1(): x = test()
f1()

# Memory get collected correctly

The differences between the two methods is that, in the second one, the local scope changes when f1() is called, and I think that the garbage collector fires up when x goes out of scope as the function returns control back to the main script. If the scope doesn't change, then the garbage collector waits until the difference between the number of allocations and the number of deallocations exceeds its threshold (on my machine, the threshold is 700 by default- running Python 2.7).

We can figure out a little of what's going on:

import sys
import gc

class test:
    def __init__(self):
        self.buf = '1'*1024*1024*200
x = test()

print gc.get_count()
# Prints (168, 8, 0)

So, we see that the garbage collector fires up numerous times, but for some reason doesn't collect x. If you test with the other version:

import sys
import gc

class test:
    def __init__(self):
        self.buf = '1'*1024*1024*200
def f1(): x = test()
f1()

print gc.get_count()
# Prints (172, 8, 0)

In this case, we know that it does manage to collect x. So, it seems that when x is declared in the global scope, it retain some cyclic reference to itself that prevents it from being collected. We can always use del x to manually force the collection, but of course that isn't ideal. If using gc.get_referrers(x), we'll be able to see what objects still refer to x, and maybe that will give a clue on how to stop that from happening.

I know that I didn't really solve the issue, but hopefully this helped you in the right direction. I'll keep this issue in mind, in case I find something later.

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The cyclic garbage collector doesn't "fire up" to destroy local variables -- it isn't involved in local variables as such at all. Python uses reference counting, and destroying local variables is as simple as a decref operation. The gc module's collector is a separate thing, and really only fires up when the allocation threshold is hit (or when you call it manually, of course.) –  Thomas Wouters Jun 9 '11 at 23:32
    
@Thomas: Oh, I see. Calling gc.collect() manually doesn't destroy x if it isn't evaluated within exec, however. Why would that be? –  voithos Jun 9 '11 at 23:39
    
I'm not sure which case you're describing here. The cyclic-gc collector will only collect unreachable, collectable reference cycles. References to objects. x is a local variable -- it's a name, not an object. It holds a reference. The thing x refers to can be unreachable, but only by x no longer existing. Or the thing x refers to can be part of an unreachable reference cycle, but only if the frame that contains x is also part of that unreachable reference cycle. –  Thomas Wouters Jun 9 '11 at 23:42
    
@Thomas: I'm referring to the line x = test(). After that call, x is never referred to again. But it doesn't get destroyed, so does that mean that something is still referencing it? Is it referencing itself? –  voithos Jun 9 '11 at 23:46
    
The x local variable refers to it. If you mean "like in the original code", the local namespace is the global namespace -- the context dict -- and it's part of the reference cycle. It won't go away until context['x'] is deleted somehow, or context itself is destroyed (which requires breaking the reference cycle.) –  Thomas Wouters Jun 9 '11 at 23:56

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