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I have implemented IEquatable<T> to compare objects in two lists however i want to do it conditionally like this:

public bool Equals(CustomerType other)
{

    if (this.Zipcode == "11111" || this.Zipcode == "22222" || this.Zipcode== "33333")
       {
          return this.FirstName.Equals(other.FirstName) && this.LastName.Equals(other.LastName) && this.MiddleName.Equals(other.MiddleName);
       }
       else
       {
          return this.FirstName.Equals(other.FirstName);
       }
}

Something is wrong here and it never goes to else condition. Can someone please tell me where am i going wrong?

--Usage--

var v = listA.Except(listB).ToList();

--GetHashCode implementation--

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        unchecked
        {

            int hash = 17;         
            hash = hash * 23 + this.intField1.GetHashCode();         
            hash = hash * 23 + this.intField2.GetHashCode();         
            hash = hash * 23 + this.stringField3.GetHashCode();
            hash = hash * 23 + this.doubleField4.GetHashCode();
            hash = hash * 23 + this.doubleField5.GetHashCode();         

            return hash;
        }
    }

--Equals--

    public override bool Equals(object obj) 
    {
        if (obj == null) return base.Equals(obj);
        if (obj is CustomerType ) 
        { 
            return this.Equals((CustomerType)obj); 
        } 
        else 
        { 
            return false; 
        } 
    }

--Example--

ListA has 2 Customers:

Cust1: FirstName - "A" LastName - "Z" MiddleName - "Y" ZipCode - "11111"

Cust2: FirstName - "B" LastName - "X" MiddleName - "W" ZipCode - "44444"

ListB has 2 Customers:

Cust1: FirstName - "A" LastName - "Z" MiddleName - "Y" ZipCode - "11111"

Cust2: FirstName - "B" LastName - "G" MiddleName - "G" ZipCode - "44444"

Here when i say ListA.Except(ListB), it shud compare CustA with FirstName, MiddleName, LastName because it belongs to Zipcode 11111 and CustB with only FirstName and the same applies when i say ListB.Except(ListA). What is happeing in current Equals implementation is that it works fine with ListA.Except(ListB) but when i say ListB.Except(ListA), it compares FirstName, LastName and Middlename for CustB.

share|improve this question
    
Can we see the code that actually uses this? I have a suspicion about what the problem is, but would like to verify by seeing how you are using it. –  Eric Petroelje Jun 9 '11 at 18:00
    
@Eric Petroelje - Edited the code usage –  Asdfg Jun 9 '11 at 18:05
    
Did you override the normal equals too? –  CodesInChaos Jun 9 '11 at 18:47
    
Yes. I did. Edited the question with the implementation. –  Asdfg Jun 9 '11 at 18:58
    
Now it returns the list with customers whose zipcode is not 11111 or 22222 or 33333. Its not comparing FirstName only –  Asdfg Jun 9 '11 at 19:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Regarding the symmetry of your equals and hashcode functions and based on what you said in the comments on another answer, I believe this is the implementation you need:

public bool Equals(CustomerType other)
{

    if ((this.Zipcode == "11111" || this.Zipcode == "22222" || this.Zipcode== "33333") &&
        (other.Zipcode == "11111" || other.Zipcode == "22222" || other.Zipcode== "33333"))
       {
          return this.FirstName.Equals(other.FirstName) && 
                 this.LastName.Equals(other.LastName) && 
                 this.MiddleName.Equals(other.MiddleName);
       }
       else
       {
          return this.FirstName.Equals(other.FirstName);
       }
}

And for GetHashCode:

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    if (this.Zipcode == "11111" || this.Zipcode == "22222" || this.Zipcode== "33333")
    {
        return FirstName.GetHashCode() ^ LastName.GetHashCode() ^ MiddleName.GetHashCode();
    }
    else
    {
        return FirstName.GetHashCode();
    }
}

ETA - to expand a bit - it appears your implementation simply isn't consistent with the definition of equality.

Making a slightly different assumption (that customer B and A have the same first name), ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Is Customer A equal to Customer B? By your code, the answer is no.
  2. Is Customer B equal to Customer A? By your code, the answer is yes.

When comparing Customer A to Customer B, your implementation will use first, last & middle names. But when comparing Customer B to Customer A, your implementation will only use first name. This violates the fundamental definition of equality:

The symmetric property states:

* For any quantities a and b, if a = b, then b = a.

Any built in functions that rely on your Equals method will assume that its implementation is consistent with the definition of equality. Since your implementation is not, you are violating that assumption and therefore getting inconsistent results.

share|improve this answer
    
Xoring multiple properties in GetHashCode is usually a bad idea, since then the hash is invariant under commutation of those properties. So collisions get more likely. It's probably no problem in this case, but I'd generally avoid it. –  CodesInChaos Jun 9 '11 at 21:12
    
And you should add null handling to your Equals. –  CodesInChaos Jun 9 '11 at 21:13
    
@Code - both good points, left out the null handling for clarity (and since he didn't have it in his, so figured it was uneccessary in his case) –  Eric Petroelje Jun 9 '11 at 21:17
    
I have null check in Equals. I just didnt put it in here. Your answer is very helpful. Now i understand what you guys meant by "symmetry of your Equals". Sorry no CS or Engineering background. Just one question tho. If i put other.Zipcode first in the equals, it gives me wrong results. Does that order matter? –  Asdfg Jun 10 '11 at 12:56

I'm pretty sure you did't implement GetHashCode() correctly. Whenever you override Equals you must override GetHashCode() so they are consistent.

The condition is that if for two objects o1.Equals(o2) returns true then the results of GetHashCode must be the same.

Since Except uses a hashset internally the implementation of GetHashCode() is relevant here. Without a hashset it's complexity would grow from O(n) to O(n^2) which is clearly undesirable.

In addition to that Equals should be symmetrical and yours isn't.


Looking into your GetHashCode() function it is clearly wrong. It takes fields into account that Equals doesn't.

Whenever your code goes into the then part of the if it may take FirstName, LastName and MiddleName into account. When your code goes into the else part it may only take FirstName into account for GetHashCode().

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    unchecked
    {
    if (this.Zipcode == "11111" || this.Zipcode == "22222" || this.Zipcode== "33333")
    {
        return FirstName.GetHashCode()*529+
               LastName.GetHashCode()*23+
               MiddleName.GetHashCode();
    }
    else
    {
        return FirstName.GetHashCode();
    }
}

But even with this implementation of GetHashCode() you'll still should fix the symmetry of your Equals

share|improve this answer
    
@CodeInChaos - I have implemented GethashCode. Let me put the implementation in the question detail –  Asdfg Jun 9 '11 at 18:13
    
+1 for mentioning the symmetry issue. Even if GetHashCode is implemented consistently, I suspect this may be the issue. –  Eric Petroelje Jun 9 '11 at 18:17
    
what fields should i include in GetHashCode? Only those which i need to compare? –  Asdfg Jun 9 '11 at 18:18
    
Obiously only those you compare. Else the consistency condition is violated when you have two objects that are identical in the compared fields but differ in other hashed fields. –  CodesInChaos Jun 9 '11 at 18:24
    
no idea what you mean by " symmetry of your Equals". What is wrong with it? Can you please explain and suggest what should i fix there? –  Asdfg Jun 9 '11 at 18:27

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