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I've got something like this:

namespace n1
{
    namespace n2
    {
        class foo{}
    }
}

In other file I write:

using n1;

Why I can't type now something like:

n2.foo smthing;

And how to make something like this possibile?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Use namespace aliases:

using n2 = n1.n2;

...
n2.foo something;

What is before the class name should be a complete name space (with/or other class name(s) for nested types). A truncated namespace will not work.

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This is a deliberate rule of C#. If you do this:

namespace Frobozz
{
    namespace Magic
    {
        class Lamp {}
    }

    class Foo
    {
        Magic.Lamp myLamp; // Legal; Magic means Frobozz.Magic when inside Frobozz
    }
}

That is legal. But this is not:

namespace Frobozz
{
    namespace Magic
    {
        class Lamp {}
    }
}

namespace Flathead
{
    using Frobozz;
    class Bar
    {
        Magic.Lamp myLamp; // Illegal; merely using Frobozz does not bring Magic into scope
    }
}

The rule of C# that describes this is in section 7.6.2 of the C# 4 spec. This is a very confusing section; the bit you want is the paragraph near the end that says

Otherwise, if the namespaces imported by the using-namespace-directives of the namespace declaration contain exactly one type having name I...

The key point is that it says "exactly one type", not "exactly one type or namespace". We deliberately disallow you "slicing" a namespace name like this when you are outside of that namespace because it is potentially confusing. As others have said, if you want to do that sort of thing, fully qualify it once in a using-alias directive and then use the alias.

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Quite late here, but... Can I use this namespace scoping to DEFINE nested namespaces without the need to use fully qualified names for the new namespaces? That would ease things a lot, avoiding duplicated and typo-prone typing... –  heltonbiker Apr 26 '13 at 18:01
    
@heltonbiker: That sounds like a great question for StackOverflow... which is the site you're already on. Post a question! –  Eric Lippert Apr 26 '13 at 19:55
    
Well, your're right. Interestingly, I tried it and it works. Unfortunately, namespaces only appear in the Class View panel of Visual Studio if they have something (a class, for example) defined inside them. Thanks for your attention! –  heltonbiker Apr 26 '13 at 20:00

By design, namespaces are there to help you define scope.

Unless you fully qualify it, you will get the error you're seeing.

Assuming File1 has something like this:

namespace n1
{
    namespace n2
    {
        class Foo { }
    }
}

You can do this two ways:

Fully qualified using

File2 contents:

namespace n3
{
    using n1.n2;

    class TestClass
    {
        private Foo something;
    }
}

Use a namespace alias

namespace n3
{
    using n2 = n1.n2;

    class TestClass
    {
        private n2.Foo something;
    }
}
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Section 9.4.2 paragraph 4 in the C# language specification explains this behavior explicitly:

A using-namespace-directive imports the types contained in the given namespace, but specifically does not import nested namespaces.

It even goes on to give an example that is very similar to your own.

namespace N1.N2
{
    class A {}
}
namespace N3
{
    using N1;
    class B: N2.A {}        // Error, N2 unknown
}

Of course had you done this:

namespace n1
{
  public class Example
  {
    public static void Main()
    {
      n2.Foo a; // This is legal.
    }
  }
}

This would compile because n2 is accessible since it is referenced from within an ancestor namespace block.

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Look at the Example!

namespace a
{
  class a
   {
     public void print()
     {
     Console.WriteLine("Namespace A");    
     }
   } 
}

namespace b
{
   class b
   {
     void display()
     {
      Console.WriteLine("Displaying");
     }

     static void Main(String []args)  //Main Function
     {
      a.a aobject = new a.a();  // Here "a.a" First a - refers to namespace
      aobject.print();

      b bobject = new b();
      bobject.display();
     }
   }
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