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the code below is tested and working, it prints the contents of a feed that has this structure.

<rss>
    <channel>
        <item>
            <pubDate/>
            <title/>
            <description/>
            <link/>
            <author/>
        </item>
    </channel>
</rss>

What I didn't manage to succesfully do is to print feeds that follow this structure below (the difference is on <feed><entry><published> ) even though I changed the xpath to /feed//entry. you can see the structure on the page source.

<feed>
    <entry>
        <published/>
        <title/>
        <description/>
        <link/>
        <author/>
    </entry>
</feed>

I have to say that the code sorts all item based on its pubDate. In the second structure feed I guess it should sort all entry based on its published.

I probably make a mistake on the xPath I can't find. However, if at the end of this I manage to print that feed right, how can I modify the code to handle different structures all at once ?

Is there any service that allow me to create and host my own feeds based on those feeds, so I will have the same structure to all? I hope I made my self clear... Thank you.

<?php

$feeds = array();

// Get all feed entries
$entries = array();
foreach ($feeds as $feed) {
    $xml = simplexml_load_file($feed);
    $entries = array_merge($entries, $xml->xpath(''));
}

?>
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2  
"I probably make a mistake on the xPath I can't find." Which XPath are you speaking about? –  empo Jun 18 '11 at 21:06
    
Good question, +1. See my answer for a general solution in which you provide the alternative element names as parameters and it ... works. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Jun 18 '11 at 21:54
1  
It may not seem significant if you aren't as familiar with XML and namespaces, but if you are working with RSS and ATOM feeds the ATOM elements are in the ATOM namespace: http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom. Your example ATOM XML does not reflect the namespace that is likely in the documents you are working with. –  Mads Hansen Jun 19 '11 at 0:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

The main contribution of this answer is a solution (at the end) that can be used with infinite number of formats, just specifying all "entry" alternative names in the external (global) parameter $postElements and all "published-date" alternative names in the external (global) parameter $pub-dateElements.

Besides this, here is how to specify an XPath expression that selects all /rss//item and all /feed//entry elements.

In the simple case of just two possible document formats this (as proposed by @Josh Davis) Xpath expression correctly works:

/rss//item  |   /feed//entry

A more general XPath expression allows the selection of the wanted elements from a set of unlimited number of document formats:

/*[contains($topElements, concat('|',name(),'|'))]
    //*[contains($postElements, concat('|',name(),'|'))]

where the variable $topElements should be substituted by a pipe-delimited string of all possible names for a top element, and $postElements should be substituted by a pipe-delimited string of all possible names for a "entry" element. We also allow the "entry" elements to be at different depths in the different document formats.

In particular, for this concrete case the XPath expression will be;

/*[contains('|feed|rss|', concat('|',name(),'|'))]
    //*[contains('|item|entry|', concat('|',name(),'|'))]

The rest of this post shows how the complete wanted processing can be done entirely in XSLT -- easily and with elegance.


I. A gentle introduction

Such processing is easy and simple with XSLT:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <myFeed>
   <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </myFeed>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="channel|feed">
  <xsl:apply-templates select="*">
   <xsl:sort select="pubDate|published" order="descending"/>
  </xsl:apply-templates>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="item|entry">
  <post>
    <xsl:apply-templates mode="identity"/>
  </post>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="pubDate|published" mode="identity">
  <publicationDate>
   <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </publicationDate>
 </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="node()|@*" mode="identity">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*" mode="identity"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied to this XML document (in format 1):

<rss>
    <channel>
        <item>
            <pubDate>2011-06-05</pubDate>
            <title>Title1</title>
            <description>Description1</description>
            <link>Link1</link>
            <author>Author1</author>
        </item>
        <item>
            <pubDate>2011-06-06</pubDate>
            <title>Title2</title>
            <description>Description2</description>
            <link>Link2</link>
            <author>Author2</author>
        </item>
        <item>
            <pubDate>2011-06-07</pubDate>
            <title>Title3</title>
            <description>Description3</description>
            <link>Link3</link>
            <author>Author3</author>
        </item>
    </channel>
</rss>

and when it is applied on this equivalent document (in format 2):

<feed>
        <entry>
            <published>2011-06-05</published>
            <title>Title1</title>
            <description>Description1</description>
            <link>Link1</link>
            <author>Author1</author>
        </entry>
        <entry>
            <published>2011-06-06</published>
            <title>Title2</title>
            <description>Description2</description>
            <link>Link2</link>
            <author>Author2</author>
        </entry>
        <entry>
            <published>2011-06-07</published>
            <title>Title3</title>
            <description>Description3</description>
            <link>Link3</link>
            <author>Author3</author>
        </entry>
</feed>

in both cases the same wanted, correct result is produced:

<myFeed>
   <post>
      <publicationDate>2011-06-07</publicationDate>
      <title>Title3</title>
      <description>Description3</description>
      <link>Link3</link>
      <author>Author3</author>
   </post>
   <post>
      <publicationDate>2011-06-06</publicationDate>
      <title>Title2</title>
      <description>Description2</description>
      <link>Link2</link>
      <author>Author2</author>
   </post>
   <post>
      <publicationDate>2011-06-05</publicationDate>
      <title>Title1</title>
      <description>Description1</description>
      <link>Link1</link>
      <author>Author1</author>
   </post>
</myFeed>

II. The full solution

This can be generalized to a parameterized solution:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:param name="postElements" select=
 "'|entry|item|'"/>
 <xsl:param name="pub-dateElements" select=
  "'|published|pubDate|'"/>

  <xsl:template match="node()|@*" name="identity">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*" mode="identity"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <myFeed>
   <xsl:apply-templates select=
   "//*[contains($postElements, concat('|',name(),'|'))]">
    <xsl:sort order="descending" select=
     "*[contains($pub-dateElements, concat('|',name(),'|'))]"/>
   </xsl:apply-templates>
  </myFeed>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="*">
  <xsl:choose>
   <xsl:when test=
    "contains($postElements, concat('|',name(),'|'))">
    <post>
      <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </post>
   </xsl:when>
   <xsl:when test=
   "contains($pub-dateElements, concat('|',name(),'|'))">
    <publicationDate>
     <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </publicationDate>
   </xsl:when>
   <xsl:otherwise>
    <xsl:call-template name="identity"/>
   </xsl:otherwise>
  </xsl:choose>
 </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

This transformation can be used with infinite number of formats, just specifying all "entry" alternative names in the external (global) parameter $postElements and all "published-date" alternative names in the external (global) parameter $pub-dateElements.

Anyone can try this transformation to verify that when applied on the two XML documents above it again produces the same, wanted and correct result.

share|improve this answer
    
This is one great answer, thank you for this. So, I have a PHP code that loads stylesheet.xslt and eshop1.xml. How can I load multiple xml like eshop1.xml and eshop2.xml ? –  Xalloumokkelos Jun 21 '11 at 13:19
1  
@Punkis: You are welcome. As for your next question, XSLT has standard capabilities to process more than one XML document -- read about the standard XSLT document() function. Also, XSLT 2.0 can easily produce more than one result documents -- read about the <xsl:result-document> element. If you are using XSLT 1.0 you can produce one aggregate result and then split it and save it into the wanted files by either using DOM (ugly), or applying (once for each result) another XSLT transformation that would produce only one of the results. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jun 21 '11 at 13:31

This question is really two questions, "How to handle multiple xpath at once" and "[How to] create my own feeds with the same structure".

The second one has been brilliantly answered by Dimitre Novatchev. If you want to "merge" or transform one or several XML documents, that's definitely what I'd recommend.

Meanwhile, I'll take the easy path and address the first question, "How to handle multiple xpath at once". It's easy, there's an operator for that: |. If you want to query all nodes that match /feed//entry or /rss//item then you can use /feed//entry | /rss//item.

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Here's a solutions.

The problem is that many RSS or Atom feeds have namespaces defined which don't play nicely with SimpleXML. In the example below, I'm using str_replace to replace xmlns= to ns=. I'm then using the name of the root element to determine the type of feed (whether it's RSS or Atom).

The array_push call takes care of adding all of the entries to the $entries array which you can then use later.

$entries = array();

foreach ( $feeds as $feed )
{
  $xml = simplexml_load_string(str_replace('xmlns=', 'ns=', $feed));

  switch ( strtolower($xml->getName()) )
  {
    // Atom
    case 'feed':
      array_push($entries, $xml->xpath('/feed//entry'));

      break;

    // RSS
    case 'rss':
      array_push($entries, $xml->xpath('/rss//item'));

      break;
  }

  // Unset the namespace variable.
  unset($namespaces);
}

var_dump($entries);

Another solution could be to use Google Reader to aggregate all of your feeds and use that feed instead of all of your separate ones.

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