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So, I am just testing NSNotifications on a variety of cases and this one is confusing. I would appreciate it if you could help me understand NSNotifications !

I have a Navigation Controller.

I have a UIBarButtonItem called "Add", which posts notification DidAddNotification

If I click Add it pushes me to view2.

 // I add view2 as observer and write method for this and NSlog if it gets implemented //

I again push myself to view 3.

// I add view3 as another observer and use the same method as the previous view and I NSlog if it gets implemented//

From View 3, I popToRootViewControllerAnimated:YES and I get back to 1. and again follow the same procedure.

So this is how the control is ...

1 -> 2 -> 3 -> 1

if I press add again,

the control is again the same 1 -> 2-> 3-> 1

Here's the output (NSLogs) :

I press Add for the first time:

2011-06-09 14:47:41.912 Tab[5124:207]  I am the notification in view2
2011-06-09 14:47:41.912 Tab[5124:207]  I pressed Add Button and I just sent a notification from view 1
  // No notification in view 3 ?? //  I am now back to view 1.

I press Add again:

2011-06-09 14:47:51.950 Tab[5124:207] I am the notification in view3
2011-06-09 14:47:51.951 Tab[5124:207]  I pressed Add Button and I just sent a notification from view 1
 // No Notification in view 2 ??? // ... I am now back to view 1.

I press Add one more time:

2011-06-09 14:47:59.160 Tab[5124:207] I am the notification in view 3
2011-06-09 14:47:59.161 Tab[5124:207]  I pressed Add Button and I just sent a notification from view 1

 // No Notification in view 2 ??? //  ... I am now back to view 1.


And this goes on..

Could anyone tell me why

  1. NSLog did not print in view 3 for the first time but prints all other time?
  2. Why NSLog prints in view 2 for the first time and never prints it again ?

Code:

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] postNotificationName:@"DidAddNotification" object:self];  // I put this in the - (IBAction) for addData

- (void)didPressAdd:(NSNotification *)notification { //NSLogs// }

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(didPressAdd:) name:@"DidAddNotification" object:nil]; // I put this in the viewDidLoad of view 1 and view 2
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1  
please post code, your question is too long and hard to understand. –  Vincent Guerci Jun 9 '11 at 19:04
    
Please tell me which part is hard to understand, and I will do my best to edit and post it back. –  Legolas Jun 9 '11 at 19:09
    
That's odd that only certain notifications fire. How are you setting up the observers? –  slev Jun 9 '11 at 19:32
2  
I got mine working just fine. I'm not sure how you set yours up, but I've got a working project. I'll post the code in an answer so you can look at it –  slev Jun 9 '11 at 20:13
1  
Sorry, but I still don't get your logs and sequence of actions, without much code I can't figure WHEN notifications are posted and consequently WHEN they are supposed to be received. And it is likely a problem of sequencing actions. Another potential source of error is not releasing the controllers by keeping a retain somewhere on them. Try to simplify your issue to a real simple code and post it COMPLETELY with ALL corresponding logs :) –  Vincent Guerci Jun 9 '11 at 23:17
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3 Answers 3

The differences you are describing seem to be due to changes in which objects are alive when. Views and view controllers do not exist indefinitely, and are not all created when the app starts. An object has to exist to receive and log a notification. The basic notification system is working as expected.

You should be able to see the effect of lifetime on the messages received if you add log statements announcing when an object that is supposed to receive one of these notifications is created and when it is destroyed within the body of -init (or whatever the designated initializer of your superclass is) and -dealloc.

Also: Your log statements will be easier to track down if you tag them with the function doing the logging like NSLog(@"%s: <message>", __func__). The compiler generates a string named __func__ for each function that contains the function's name.

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I just set up a navigation-based app. In the root controller header, I've got this:

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

extern NSString * const EPNotification;

@interface RootViewController : UITableViewController {
}
@end

All I really did different there was set up a string to be used throughout the code. Then in the root implementation file, I have this (plus all the standard stuff):

#import "RootViewController.h"
#import "One.h"

NSString *const EPNotification = @"Notification"; // this will be the global string name for the notification

@implementation RootViewController


#pragma mark -
#pragma mark View lifecycle

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];

    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(gotNotification:) name:EPNotification
                                           object:nil];

    UIBarButtonItem *next = [[UIBarButtonItem alloc] initWithTitle:@"next" style:UIBarButtonItemStylePlain                                                          target:self action:@selector(sendNotification)];

    self.navigationItem.rightBarButtonItem = next;
    [next release];
}

- (void)sendNotification {
    NSDictionary *d = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObject:@"view 1" forKey:@"sender"];
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] postNotificationName:@"Notification" object:self userInfo:d];
    One *o = [[One alloc] initWithNibName:@"One" bundle:nil];
    [self.navigationController pushViewController:o animated:YES];
    [o release];
}

- (void)gotNotification:(NSNotification *)note {
    NSLog(@"from %@", [[note userInfo] objectForKey:@"sender"]);
}

I've got 3 other views (One, Two and Three, respectively), that are pretty much all exactly the same. Nothing in the header (besides the standard stuff). I'll post one of the .m files so you can see the setup.

#import "One.h"
#import "Two.h"

@implementation One

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    [super viewDidLoad];
    UIBarButtonItem *next = [[UIBarButtonItem alloc] initWithTitle:@"next" style:UIBarButtonItemStylePlain
                                                     target:self action:@selector(sendNotification)];

    self.navigationItem.rightBarButtonItem = next;
    [next release];
}

- (void)sendNotification {
    NSDictionary *d = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObject:@"view 2" forKey:@"sender"];
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] postNotificationName:@"Notification" object:self userInfo:d];
    Two *t = [[Two alloc] initWithNibName:@"Two" bundle:nil];
    [self.navigationController pushViewController:t animated:YES];
    [t release];
}

And honestly, that's pretty much it. On my class Three, I pop to the root controller instead of create a new view controller, but that's it. It tells you which view you're on with each click of the button, so hopefully it'll help you understand better how notifications work.

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Thanks a lot for time dude. I have no clue why this is happening to me. I know this cannot be the reason - (LOL) but let me ask you this... Which Xcode are you using ? I am using the latest one with ios5 sdk beta. –  Legolas Jun 9 '11 at 20:45
    
Haha, I dunno what's going on with yours either. I'm using Xcode 3 with iOS 4.3, so that could be why. I kinda doubt it, but you never know. According to the WWDC, I know they changed the notification system, but I don't think that's got anything to do with NSNotificationCenter, but you never know –  slev Jun 9 '11 at 20:53
    
So. The odds are extremely low that they would change something like that in ios5 sdk. Lol. If I put this on developer.apple.com and ask them they would LOL at the possibility. I will just sit and analyze the code again.... (sigh) ! Thanks for the help dude. –  Legolas Jun 9 '11 at 20:57
    
My pleasure. Sucks that it's still screwing with you like that. I'd go and look at the NSNotificationCenter class reference stuff for iOS5 to see if there's any changes made. Also, I might be signing up to the developer program (instead of my little free account I've had forever), since my app is getting really close to being ready to release. So if I do, I'll look over the notification stuff to see if I can get it working on that iOS version too and let you know. In the meantime, I'll be happy to help out any way I can –  slev Jun 9 '11 at 21:13
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

"The first time when you send the notification, other view controllers don't exist. They haven't been created yet. The viewController is still nil yet. Since there is no observer object, you don't get any logs. Second time around, both objects in the view controllers have been created. So they receive the notification as they are alive and the log the received notification statements."

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