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I've been relying on IoC pattern for 1 year now using structuremap & asp.net mvc. IoC is really neat especially if you have a lot of dependencies in your class, just inject dependency in your constructor and your done, the IoC will auto-inject it for you.

My question is that im using asp.net mvc with a controller class which have IServices dependencies.

I need the dependency services only for a certain controller action let say "/customer/add" but i don't need those dependency on other action let say "/Customer/Index". However, since i'm using a DI (Dependency injection) in constructor, the dependency are always instantiated even if i don't need them. Is that any good? object creation is expensive and consume memory footprint.

Of course, i can do container.GetInstance inside an action, but it is not a good practice since you will heavily be dependent on IoC in your code and unit testing.

Any suggestion? correct me if im wrong with something.

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1  
If that's the bottleneck in your system, you have bigger problems. I wouldn't worry about it. –  George Stocker Jun 9 '11 at 19:27
1  
This concern seems like an example of optimizing before profiling -- which, of course, is backwards. –  Kirk Woll Jun 9 '11 at 19:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Updated in response to jgauffins comment

I see two straightforward ways to solve your issue:

Inject a service factory to your constructor and create the service on demand.

interface IFooService
{
    void Bar();
}

interface IFooServiceFactory
{
    IFooService CreateFooService();
}

class YourController
{
    public YourController(IFooServiceFactory fooServiceFactory)
    {
        this.fooServiceFactory = fooServiceFactory;
    }

    public void YourAction()
    {
        IFooService fooService = this.fooServiceFactory.CreateFooService();
        fooService.Bar();
    }
}

Inject a service proxy to your constructor and let the proxy create the real service on demand.

interface IFooService
{
    void Bar();
}

class FooServiceProxy : IFooService
{
    private IFooService realFooService;


    void IFooService.Bar()
    {
         IFooService realFooService = GetRealFooService();
         realFooService.Bar();
    }

    private IFooService GetRealFooService()
    {
        if(this.realFooService == null)
        {
            this.realFooService = CreateRealFooService();
        }
        return this.realFooService;
    }

    private IFooService CreateRealFooService()
    {
        // You could inject the service factory in the constructor of the proxy and use it here to create the real service.
    }
}

class YourController
{

                          Inject FooServiceProxy here
                          v
                          v 
    public YourController(IFooService fooService)
    {
         this.fooService = fooService;
    }

    public void YourAction()
    {
         this.fooService.Bar();
    }
}
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+1 for factory and lazy loading proxy. But the proxy should really keep the instance when it has been resolved instead of looking it up in every method. Wrap it in a property which check if the member var is null (and then instantiate it) –  jgauffin Jun 9 '11 at 19:54
    
Thank you, I updated my answer –  Florian Greinacher Jun 9 '11 at 20:01
    
cool dude. this is the design pattern i needed, but this might bring complexity in my code i wonder, bec. in different controllers i will have different dependencies thus different factories.. But answer is accepted. –  Petrick Lim Jun 10 '11 at 8:45
    
Let the container do this for you. My answer shows how StructureMap supports delayed instantiation. –  Joshua Flanagan Jun 11 '11 at 1:09

I always use constructors. imho properties should only be used to solve circular dependencies.

The reason is that the intent is not clear when using properties. Nothing in your code says that MyController.DoThat wont work if the property MyController.MyProperty is not set.

If a method needs a specific service, then the service is required for your whole class. Else you'll break the contract that your class exposes.

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+1 for pointing out the weakness of property injection. –  Florian Greinacher Jun 9 '11 at 19:41
    
The service dependency could be injected using a lazy implementation, couldn't? –  BlackTigerX Jun 9 '11 at 21:24
    
@BlackTigerX: But even if the dependency is lazy, you would still inject a dependency, not null (except while unit testing perhaps). –  Steven Jun 10 '11 at 8:30

the dependency are always instantiated even if i don't need them. Is that any good?

Although not every part of the class requires the dependency, the class itself needs that dependency and it is therefore not an optional dependency. Typically when you see that some dependencies are used in one part of the class and other dependency in another part, your class might be violating the SRP; it might be doing more than one thing. Splitting them up however, would probably not help you since MVC Controller classes are more focused around interfaces, so I would just leave it as it is.

object creation is expensive and consume memory footprint.

Reference types always have a 8 bytes overhead (on the 32 bits platform), so that's not much. The service object you would normally inject do contain very little state, often just some configuration values and references to their dependencies. From a memory perspective, it is nothing compared to the data that flows through you application (such as data from the database or the strings that get generated by MVC to build the HTML). It does depend on the DI framework you use, but typically even a relatively big dependency graph will get generated in a split second. And even when graph construction takes too much time, there are other ways to optimize performance. Consider defining some services with a singleton lifestyle for instance. When this is not enough, you might want to consider switching to a faster DI framework. StructureMap however, is one of the faster DI containers in the field (of the more commonly known ones), so for normal application development, this shouldn't be a problem.

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Thank you Steven. This is also my guess and you made it clearer and confirm it. This is also a good answer since i don't want anymore complexity in my code. I'll just vote your answer. –  Petrick Lim Jun 10 '11 at 8:47

The way I've always done it was that for injected dependencies that are optional (such as in the scenario you just described where only certain methods requires the dependency), set them up as properties. For required dependencies, use constructor injection.

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2  
In my opinion the service dependency is required because the class as a whole needs it and will not work with the service being absent. –  Florian Greinacher Jun 9 '11 at 19:40

StructureMap supports delayed instantiation - no need to craft your own service factory/proxy solution. If you only want IService instantiated when in the actions it is used, inject a Func<IService> into your constructor instead. Then, in your action that needs it, invoke the Func to return the instance.

class CustomerController {
  Func<IService> _service;

  public CustomerController(Func<IService> service){
    _service = service;
  }

  public ActionResult Index(){
    _service().CallMethodOnService();
  }
}

However, I would first make sure that instantiating the service really is a performance problem before going to this extra effort.

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