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I am learning components in vb by following http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/151w6x12(v=VS.100).aspx

Everything works exactly as tutorial until adding code for the constructor. There is no Sub New in my added component in CDemo.vb. I found Sub New in CDemo.Designer.vb (which I think is generated by system).

<System.Diagnostics.DebuggerNonUserCode()> _
Public Sub New()
    MyBase.New()

    'This call is required by the Component Designer.
    InitializeComponent()

End Sub

If I add sub New in CDemo.vb as follows,it has error BC30269: 'Public Sub New()' has multiple definitions with identical signatures.

Public Class CDemo

    Public ReadOnly InstanceID As Integer
    Private Shared NextInstanceID As Integer = 0
    Private Shared ClassInstanceCount As Long = 0

  Sub New()
    InstanceID = NextInstanceID
    NextInstanceID += 1
    ClassInstanceCount += 1

  End Sub

End Class

But if I do not add sub New in CDemo.vb, instead add code in CDemo.Designer.vb, it says project cannot start directly.

<System.Diagnostics.DebuggerNonUserCode()> _
Public Sub New()
    MyBase.New()
    InstanceID = NextInstanceID
    NextInstanceID += 1
    ClassInstanceCount += 1
    'This call is required by the Component Designer.
    InitializeComponent()

End Sub

I do not understand what is CDemo.Designer.vb and where should I add my own code? For beginner, I find it hard to distinguish system generated code and my code.

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Beware that the page you linked is outdated, pick the one that matches your version of Visual Studio. You are dealing with two problems here. One at a time:

The IDE automatically generated the code in the Designer.vb file when you added the Component to your project. There is a general rule to never edit code in the Designer file since it is normally maintained by the designer. Unless you have to and this is one such case. Cut and paste the constructors from the Designer file into your CDemo.vb source code file. Beware that there are two, don't forget to move them both. Moving them instead of re-typing the constructor takes care of the first problem.

Beware that you wrote the constructor wrong. You must add the lines, not replace the ones that are already there. Best place is after the InitializeComponent() call.

Second problem is the "project cannot start directly" error message. You cannot run a component, you must create a program that uses the component. That's described pretty well in the MSDN article you linked in the "Testing the component" section.

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Didn't catch that about "running" the component. Hans is completely correct on that. –  drventure Jun 9 '11 at 20:23
    
You are right. My Visual Studio version is 2010. Component cannot run directly. Thanks a lot! –  Summer Jun 9 '11 at 20:50
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So your assumption that the CDemo.Designer.vb code is being generated by the designer is correct. On this note you don't typically want to be making changes to this code as it can unexpectedly be changed by the Code Generation that is done by Visual Studio. The reason that it is put there is so you don't have to worry about it and you shouldn't.

It is in a partial class, which is why you don't see it typically.

On the question of where you should put your Public Sub New is that it should be in the CDemo.vb file. I think that the reason that you are getting the error for multiple definitions is that you are not declaring it as public.

It should look like this in your code.

Public Sub New()
    InstanceID = NextInstanceID
    NextInstanceID += 1
    ClassInstanceCount += 1

  End Sub
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I added Public, but the same error. Actually, when I click the error, it points to Public Sub New in CDemo.Designer.vb. So it seems to me that because of the definition of New in CDemo.Designer.vb, I cannot define my own constructor –  Summer Jun 9 '11 at 19:49
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Ahh.. you're using VS2003? It split things out a little differently. You might try Public Overrides sub New()

Or just don't put code in sub new, put it in the LOAD event (normally this is fine, though there's a few things you might have to do in sub new).

As of 2008 and 2010, at least for usercontrols, you +can+ directly enter a public sub new in your code partial class and it won't conflict with the "designer.vb" file.

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It doesn't conflict with the designer file because when you type "Public Sub New()" and hit enter, it moves all the designer code into the regular vb for you. This was added in vs2005. He can manually move the New Method from the designer file to his code in VS2003 with no problems. He must leave the call to InitializeComponent() for everything to work and add his code after that line. –  Robert Beaubien Jun 9 '11 at 23:19
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