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Why these two methods work differently:

    public List<Foo> GetFoos()
    {
        int? parentId = null;
        var l = _dataContext.Foos.Where(x => x.ParentElementId == parentId).ToList();
        return l;
    }

    public List<Foo> GetFoos()
    {
        var l = _dataContext.Foos.Where(x => x.ParentElementId == null).ToList();
        return l;
    }

The first one returns nothing. Second returns what was expected. Data comes from EF. ParentElementId is nullable.

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This has been asked on SO within the past month. I can't remember what the resolution was or what the exact question was, but it does exist. –  user166390 Jun 9 '11 at 19:48
1  
@pst knowing that, helps a lot... it is really a relieve... –  Agzam Jun 9 '11 at 19:49
1  
For example here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3205238/… –  zespri Jun 9 '11 at 20:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That is because you can't compare to null in SQL, it has the special IS NULL operator to check for null values.

The first query will be translated into a comparison, where the parameter is null:

WHERE ParentElementId = @param

This doesn't work, because comparing two null values doesn't yield true.

The second query will be translated into a null check, because the null value is a constant:

WHERE ParentElementId IS NULL

This works because EF is not fooled to translate it into a comparison.

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Well done! Once again, you showed me how important is to look sometimes into sql profiler window. Thank you! –  Agzam Jun 9 '11 at 20:19
    
Is there a preferred work-about then for getting the IS NULL off a Nullable-null? –  user166390 Jun 9 '11 at 21:27

I know, you got your answer but here is some additional insight:

  • This issue has been discussed on MSDN forums. Some people believe it's a bug, others say this is intentional behaviour due to performance reasons
  • It's always helps running EFProf or Sql Server Profiler (in case you are working with SQL Server. For example your two examples translate into two following statements respectively:

    SELECT 
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
    [Extent1].[ParentElementId] AS [ParentElementId]
    FROM [dbo].[Foo] AS [Extent1]
    WHERE [Extent1].[ParentElementId] = NULL
    
    SELECT 
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
    [Extent1].[ParentElementId] AS [ParentElementId]
    FROM [dbo].[Foo] AS [Extent1]
    WHERE [Extent1].[ParentElementId] IS NULL
    

This technique (looking at generated SQL) is often very useful when dealing with problems in EF.

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thank you... I've never heard about EFProf. Gotta try that... Thanks again –  Agzam Jun 9 '11 at 20:32

Captain Obvious: because parentId is not null, probably.

Response to edit: first one is not compilable. Type cannot be infered for null.

Response to another edit: Because EF query translates nullable types incorrectly probably

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They are null in both cases. The difference is the type in the first is == (int?)null (from == parentId, where int? parentId = null) and the type in the second is == (object)null. However, then this goes in through all the magic -- where the Expression tree is inspected -- and something causes the behavior to differ. –  user166390 Jun 9 '11 at 19:49
    
>EF query translates nullable types incorrectly. What do you mean? –  Agzam Jun 9 '11 at 20:01
    
@Agzam, EF translates your code into SQL, you can trace the queries executed by EF and find the differences. Probably Guffa is correct and EF translates first one into comparison (which doesn't work) with nulls and second one into is null. Check the actual SQL queries generated by EF. –  Snowbear Jun 9 '11 at 20:16

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