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Okay, not sure where to ask this, but I'm a beginner programmer, using Perl. I need to create an array of an array, but I'm not sure if it would be better use array/hash references, or array of hashes or hash of arrays etc.

I need an array of matches: @totalmatches

Each match contains 6 elements(strings):

@matches = ($chapternumber, $sentencenumber, $sentence, $grammar_relation, $argument1, $argument2)

I need to push each of these elements into the @matches array/hash/reference, and then push that array/hash/reference into the @totalmatches array.

The matches are found based on searching a file and selecting the strings based on meeting the criteria.

QUESTIONS

  1. Which data structure would you use?

  2. Can you push an array into another array, as you would push an element into an array? Is this an efficient method?

  3. Can you push all 6 elements simultaneously, or have to do 6 separate pushes?

  4. When working with 2-D, to loop through would you use:

    foreach (@totalmatches) { foreach (@matches) { ... } }

Thanks for any advice.

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2  
You want to build some data structures, check out perldsc - the data structures cookbook for examples on how to make and access them. perldoc.perl.org/perldsc.html –  daotoad Jun 9 '11 at 22:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Do not push one array into another array. Lists just join with each other into a new list.

Use list of references.

#create an anonymous hash ref for each match
$one_match_ref = {
     chapternumber => $chapternumber_value, 
     sentencenumber => $sentencenumber_value, 
     sentence => $sentence_value,
     grammar_relation => $grammar_relation_value, 
     arg1 => $argument1, 
     arg2 => $argument2
};

# add the reference of match into array.
push @all_matches, $one_match_ref;

# list of keys of interest
@keys = qw(chapternumber sentencenumber sentence grammer_relation arg1 arg2);
# walk through all the matches.
foreach $ref (@all_matches) {
    foreach $key (@keys) {
        $val = $$ref{$key};

    }
    # or pick up some specific keys
    my $arg1 = $$ref{arg1};
}
share|improve this answer
    
Instead of making @keys, would this work: foreach my $key (keys $one_match_ref) { ... } using the keys function? –  Jon Jun 9 '11 at 22:45
    
Also, as I'm trying to grasp these references: the $one_match_ref, can it be explicitly done by %hash = {"same contents"} and then \%hash or [%hash]?? –  Jon Jun 9 '11 at 23:16
    
@Jon keys $one_match_ref will generate an error. keys needs a hash argument, so you'll have to dereference the hash like keys %$one_match_ref. In your second question, you'll want to replace the curly brackets with parens around "same contents", then you can use \%hash to create a reference to it, but note that if you load the same hash variable with new values and create another reference, you'll just have two references to the same hash, and the old values you had will be lost. –  glibdud Jun 10 '11 at 1:14
    
@Jon Also, all that said, if you have a known, consistent number of fields per record, it's probably a little more efficient to use an array of array refs as some of the other answerers suggested, rather than an array of hash refs. –  glibdud Jun 10 '11 at 1:16
    
@glibdud: I thought it would be easier to read if I used hashes. But damn, I see how it wouldn't matter since there are a consistent number of fields... For your first comment: I read the perldoc on line for the keys function, and they said, although in progress, keys dereferenced for you??? –  Jon Jun 10 '11 at 1:27

Which data structure would you use?

An array for a ordered set of things. A hash for a set of named things.

Can you push an array into another array, as you would push an element into an array? Is this an efficient method?

If you try to push an array (1) into an array (2), you'll end up pushing all the elements of 1 into 2. That is why you would push an array ref in instead.

Can you push all 6 elements simultaneously, or have to do 6 separate pushes?

Look at perldoc -f push

push ARRAY,LIST

You can push a list of things in.

When working with 2-D, to loop through would you use:

Nested foreach is fine, but that syntax wouldn't work. You have to access the values you are dealing with.

for my $arrayref (@outer) {
    for my $item (@$arrayref) {
        $item ...
    }
}
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Thanks for the quick tutorial, nice and simple... almost. Great job keeping it a general solution. –  Jon Jun 9 '11 at 22:53

Which data structure would you use?

An array... I can't really justify that choice, but I can't imagine what you would use as keys if you used a hash.

Can you push an array into another array, as you would push an element into an array? Is this an efficient method?

Here's the thing; in Perl, arrays can only contain scalar variables - the ones which start with $. Something like...

@matrix = ();
@row = ();
$arr[0] = @row; # FAIL!

... wont't work. You will have to instead use a reference to the array:

@matrix = ();
@row = ();
$arr[0] = \@row;

Or equally:

push(@matrix, \@row);

Can you push all 6 elements simultaneously, or have to do 6 separate pushes?

If you use references, you need only push once... and since you don't want to concatenate arrays (you need an array of arrays) you're stuck with no alternatives ;)

When working with 2-D, to loop through would you use:

I'd use something like:

for($i=0; $i<@matrix; $i++) {
    @row = @{$matrix[$i]}; # de-reference
    for($j=0; $j<@row; $j++) {
        print "| "$row[$j];
    }
    print "|\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, you really cleared up a bit of the references and push portion. And how to dereference explicitly. When I asked earlier about for loops, I was told that style gives an "off-by-one" error, why is that not the case... I now use 0..#$matrix instead –  Jon Jun 9 '11 at 22:51

Which data structure would you use?

Some fundamental container properties:

  • An array is a container for ordered scalars.

  • A hash is a container for scalars obtained by a unique key (there can be no duplicate keys in the hash). The order of values added later is not available anymore.

I would use the same structure like ZhangChn proposed.

Use a hash for each match. The details of the match then can be accessed by descriptive names instead of plain numerical indices. i.e. $ref->{'chapternumber'} instead of $matches[0].

Take references of these anonymous hashes (which are scalars) and push them into an array in order to preserve the order of the matches.

To dereference items from the data structure

  • get an item from the array which is a hash reference

  • retrieve any matching detail you need from the hash reference

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thanks for helping me understand the answer. Really helpful. –  Jon Jun 9 '11 at 22:50

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