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Is there a way I can specify and get data from a web site URL on to a CSV file for analysis using R?

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1  
What is the format in which data is stored on the page? –  Anirudh Ramanathan Jun 9 '11 at 21:04

4 Answers 4

Yes, there is, and many packages have use that feature for years. E.g. the tseries packages uses exactly this feature to download stock prices from Yahoo! for almost a decade:

R> library(tseries)
Loading required package: quadprog
Loading required package: zoo

    ‘tseries’ version: 0.10-24

    ‘tseries’ is a package for time series analysis and computational finance.

    See ‘library(help="tseries")’ for details.

R> get.hist.quote("IBM")
trying URL 'http://chart.yahoo.com/table.csv?    ## manual linebreak here
  s=IBM&a=0&b=02&c=1991&d=5&e=08&f=2011&g=d&q=q&y=0&z=IBM&x=.csv'
Content type 'text/csv' length unknown
opened URL
.......... .......... .......... .......... ..........
.......... .......... .......... .......... ..........
.......... .......... .......... .......... ..........
.......... .......... .......... .......... ..........
.......... .......... .......... .......... ..........
........
downloaded 258 Kb

             Open   High    Low  Close
1991-01-02 112.87 113.75 112.12 112.12
1991-01-03 112.37 113.87 112.25 112.50
1991-01-04 112.75 113.00 111.87 112.12
1991-01-07 111.37 111.87 110.00 110.25
1991-01-08 110.37 110.37 108.75 109.00
1991-01-09 109.75 110.75 106.75 106.87
[...]

This is all exceedingly well documented in the manual pages for help(connection) and help(url). Also see the manul on 'Data Import/Export' that came with R.

In the simplest case, just do

X <- read.csv(url("http://some.where.net/data/foo.csv"))

plus which ever options read.csv() may need.

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Often data on webpages is in the form of an XML table. You can read an XML table into R using the package XML.

In this package, the function

readHTMLTable(<url>)

will look through a page for XML tables and return a list of data frames (one for each table found).

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Beside of read.csv(url("...")) you also can use read.table("http://...").

Example:

> sample <- read.table("http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/examples/ara/angell.txt")
> sample
                V1   V2   V3   V4 V5
1        Rochester 19.0 20.6 15.0  E
2         Syracuse 17.0 15.6 20.2  E
...
43         Atlanta  4.2 70.6 32.6  S
> 
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scan can read from a web page automatically; you don't necessarily have to mess with connections.

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Methinks you need the connection to access the (remote, after all) web page. Connection are a wonderful abstraction that allow you to use a file, a URL, a pipe to stdout from a command etc pp in a consistent way. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jun 9 '11 at 21:44
    
Not that I doubt the useful of connections, but the help file for scan says that "file can also be a complete URL." I've done it that way without a formal connection and it does work. –  Aaron Jun 10 '11 at 13:04
    
But you usually do not want scan but rather read.table() or read.csv() which give you higher level access. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Jun 10 '11 at 13:06
    
True. I realize now I read the title and not the question, where it says a CSV file. If the format of the file is nonstandard, that's when you (might) want scan. (That's the situation I used it for.) –  Aaron Jun 10 '11 at 13:09

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