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If i have a sample code like this:

void func_1 {
.......
func_2;
}
func_2{
.......
}

I need to declare a function identifier for func_2 so that the code could run how do i do that?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't understand what you're saying. Do you want to run func_2() at the end of func_1()? What problems are you having now? – David Thornley Jun 9 '11 at 21:56
    
I need to call func_2 from func_1 but the thing is that i wrote func_2 after func_1 so i have to write an identifer at the top , right?? – Shadi Jun 9 '11 at 21:58
    
This doesn't look like legal C or C++ -- functions have round brackets after their identifier. Declaration is int f(double x);, definition is int f(double x) { return -1; }. You can declare func_2 before you define func_1, that should do the trick. – Kerrek SB Jun 10 '11 at 0:50

If func_2 won't call func_1, then you can just reorder them:

void func_2()
{
}

void func_1()
{
  // ...
  func_2();
}

If they both call each other, then you can declare like so:

void func2();
void func1()
{
  // ...
  func2();
}

void func2()
{
  // ...
  func1();
}
share|improve this answer
void func_2 ();

void func_1 ()
{
 ...
}

void func_2 ()
{
 ...
}
share|improve this answer
4  
The declaration of func_2 should be above the definition of func_1. – hammar Jun 9 '11 at 21:59
    
But technically it can go anywhere, but yes, it probably should. – judda Jun 9 '11 at 22:02
3  
the question states that func_2 is called from func_1 so the ordering is not optional. – Mark Ransom Jun 9 '11 at 22:05
1  
Inside a class, functions can be in any order. Stand-alone functions, however, can only call functions that have already been defined (or have forward references defined). – Ferruccio Jun 9 '11 at 23:05
    
Sorry, I missed that statement about it needing to be called from inside. – judda Jun 10 '11 at 1:37

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