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I have to following sproc:

USE [CW]
GO
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[addCustomer]
@firstname VARCHAR(50) = '',
@lastname VARCHAR(50) = '',
@email VARCHAR(50) = '',
@password VARCHAR(50) = ''


AS
BEGIN
    -- SET NOCOUNT ON added to prevent extra result sets from
    -- interfering with SELECT statements.
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
SELECT * FROM customer WHERE email = @email

IF (@@ROWCOUNT = 0)
    BEGIN
        -- Add to database.
        INSERT INTO customer (firstname, lastname, email, [password]) 
        VALUES (@firstname, @lastname, @email, @password);
        SELECT @@IDENTITY;
    END
ELSE
    BEGIN
        -- Don't add already registered
        SELECT customer.customerID FROM customer WHERE email = @email;
    END


END

It's to add a customer to a table. If their email is already in the table, it returns the id for that customer. If the email is not in the table already, it creates it and returns the new id.

The problem is, when its creating the new record, it returns null. But when I execute the sproc in Management Studio it shows a correct return value.

Here's the code:

            SqlCommand cmd0 = new SqlCommand();
            cmd0.Connection = conn;
            cmd0.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            cmd0.CommandText = "addCustomer";
            cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@firstname", firstname);
            cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@lastname", lastname);
            cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@email", email);
            cmd0.Parameters.AddWithValue("@password", password);

            var scaled = cmd0.ExecuteScalar();
            customerID = scaled.ToString();

customerID is null when the email is unique.

share|improve this question
    
Or make email the PK :D and ditch the identitycol –  Mike Miller Jun 9 '11 at 22:13
    
Unrelated to your problem, but in almost all cases @@IDENTITY is the wrong thing, use scope_identity() instead. @@IDENTITY does not return what you expect if a trigger is every added to your table. @@IDENTITY: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187342.aspx scope_identity(): msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190315.aspx –  Shannon Severance Jun 9 '11 at 23:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Give this a try:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[addCustomer]
    @firstname VARCHAR(50) = '',
    @lastname VARCHAR(50) = '',
    @email VARCHAR(50) = '',
    @password VARCHAR(50) = ''
AS

SET NOCOUNT ON;

IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM customer WHERE email = @email)
    INSERT INTO customer (firstname, lastname, email, [password]) 
    VALUES (@firstname, @lastname, @email, @password);

SELECT customer.customerID FROM customer WHERE email = @email;

GO
share|improve this answer
    
This is a good suggestion. –  Nik Jun 9 '11 at 22:19

Grant,

Using @@ROWCOUNT is not the proper way to make sure the customer has not already been entered. It only tells you that the customer was not in the table when you checked.

The proper way is to apply a unique constraint on the email column. Then try inserting the customer row. If the row inserts then the customer is entered. If you get a unique violation then the customer already exists and you can select/return the customerID.

Once that works do what Nik already said.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not to sure that relying on an error is best practice. –  gunwin Jun 9 '11 at 22:40
    
If you don't do it that way then you either have to lock up all the resources for the duration of the insert, or you need to handle the key violation you will get when a different process inserts the customer between the time you check and the time you insert. Either way you have to handle the key violation. You might as well do it up front. –  Scott Bruns Jun 9 '11 at 22:55
    
And if you have two unique fields, you'll never know which one created the problem. –  JeffO Jun 10 '11 at 1:17

The else is redundant the first select statement is doing the same. I think that executescalar is using the first result set not the second, hence not @@identity.

Use this query first

SELECT customer.customerID FROM customer WHERE email = @email;

and get rid of the else. Then use the return value approach as suggested by the other answer.

share|improve this answer

You're not returning a scalar, you're selecting from a table, which is different. You want a RETURN statement. An alternative is to use an OUTPUT parameter. You can set your parameter in C# to be an output parameter and after you run the procedure, you can read the value from it.

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