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I have a C++ function that splits LPSTR type variable an attact it into an char array (char*) Example:

this->XMeshTexturePath = FindTexturePath(XMeshTexturePath,d3dxMaterials[i].pTextureFilename);
   //the value of XMeshTexturePath is: Models\\Textures\\
   //the value of d3dxMaterials[i].pTextureFilename is: BlaBlaBla\\BlaBla\\Cyrex.x
   //The Result(XMeshTexturePath) should be like this:"Models\\Textures\\Cyrex.x"

This is the funcion I'm trying to write:

int FindTextLength(char* Text){
    int length

h=0; for(int i=0;i

char* FindTexturePath( char* TexturePath ,LPSTR FileNameToCombine){
    int FileLength=0;
    int PathAndFileLength=0;
    char *FileName = new char;
    char *TexPathAndName = new char;

    strcpy(TexPathAndName, FileNameToCombine);
    PathAndFileLength = FindTextLength(TexPathAndName);

    for(int i=0; i<PathAndFileLength; i++){
        if( TexPathAndName[i] != NULL){
            if(TexPathAndName[i] != '\\'){
                FileName[FileLength] = TexPathAndName[i];
                FileLength++;
            }
            else 
                FileLength = 0 ;
        }else break;
    }

    int PathLength = FindTextLength(TexturePath);
    char *Result = new char;
//==============>> // I also tryed this:char *Result = new char[PathLength+FileLength];
//==============>> //                   char *Result = new char();

    for(int i=0; i<PathLength; i++){
        if( TexturePath[0] != NULL){
            Result[i] = TexturePath[i];
        }
        else break;
    }

    for(int i=0; i<FileLength; i++){
        if( FileName[0] != NULL){
            Result[PathLength + i] = FileName[i];
        }
        else break;
    }

    return **Result**; // The Problem is here It should be like this:
                       // "Models\\Textures\\Cyrex.x"
                       // But I'm taking one of these as result:
                       //    "Models\\Textures\\Cyrex.x{"
                       //    "Models\\Textures\\Cyrex.xu"
                       //    "Models\\Textures\\Cyrex.xY"
                       //    The last character is random... 8O(
}

Actualy it's not wokring so bad. The problem is when I declare an char array(char *Result = new char;) it does'not metter how much is length I'm takin an extra character at the end of final result(Result) I'm realy stucked in here if you have any idea or suggestion plase let me know. Thanks for any advice and respons.

The Solusion is adding this at the end of function:

            Result[i] = TexturePath[i];
        }
        else break;
    }

    for(int i=0; i<FileLength; i++){
        if( FileName[0] != NULL){
            Result[PathLength + i] = FileName[i];
        }
        else break;
    }
    Result[PathLength+FileLength] = '\0' ;  // This part is resloving the problem.
                                            // **Thanks for helps**.
    return Result;
}
share|improve this question
2  
It's "length," not "lenght." – Maxpm Jun 9 '11 at 23:22
    
Thanx for correction... 8) – PsyCoder Jun 10 '11 at 11:27
up vote 4 down vote accepted
char *Result = new char[PathLength+FileLength];

Result pointed data should end with the termination character \0. Or you will run into problems when returned such a string pointed by Result. So,

Result[PathLength+FileLength-1] = '\0' ;

Make sure you never overrun the buffer or even a better option is to use std::string.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course, PathLength and FileLength should be initialized properly prior to doing this. – HighCommander4 Jun 9 '11 at 23:17
    
That's the answer! I just added that termination character just before return the Result variable. And it's working just perfect thank you for information. – PsyCoder Jun 9 '11 at 23:23
2  
Don't you need PathLenght+FileLenght+1? For the null terminator? – Coder Jun 9 '11 at 23:31
    
@PsyCoder - See the edit please. What @Coder mentioned is very important. – Mahesh Jun 9 '11 at 23:37

new char allocates space for a single character. You probably mean to allocate space for an array of characters, which you can do with new char[N] where N is the size of the array (e.g. new char[40])

share|improve this answer
char *FileName = new char;
char *TexPathAndName = new char;

That should crash. You're allocating 1-character buffers, then trying to strcpy into them, which is clearly going to overflow those buffers pretty quickly. Also, remember that after the characters in the string you need 1 extra space for the null terminator.

share|improve this answer
    
I accept your information. But when I begin directX programming I saw too much imposible things such as this :D It's realy not crushing :P Also thank you for your time. – PsyCoder Jun 9 '11 at 23:26
    
If that doesn't crash, it's because you're getting lucky, not because it's correct. – Yuliy Jun 11 '11 at 18:40
    
It's crashed as you said. I'm not using it anymore :) – PsyCoder Jun 12 '11 at 11:17

Best approach is to use std::string.

If you don't, for string length there are functions like strlen/wcslen. Windows shell has also some very handy functions for path manipulation http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb773559%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

Most of them can come handy, and usually you manipulate static length char path[MAX_PATH]={} buffers.

Remember that max path is 256 or so, for deeper nested folders there are some problems.

share|improve this answer

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