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I have a class containing something like the following:

public static class Config
{
    private static Lazy<ConfigSource> _cfgSrc = new Lazy<ConfigSource>(
        () => { /* "ValueFactory" here... */ },
        true);

    public static ConfigSource ConfigSource
    {
        get { return _cfgSrc.Value; }
    }
}

In accessing the ConfigSource property, I encountered this InvalidOperationException:

ValueFactory attempted to access the Value property of this instance.

I don't see anything in my "value factory" method that accesses the Value property. Is there anything else that could be triggering this exception? This problem only happens intermittently, but once it does, it takes resetting IIS to clear up the Exception (which appears to be cached once it occurs).

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1  
There is a Connect article detailing this same problem. It recommends checking the stack trace in the exception. –  user7116 Jun 9 '11 at 23:22
2  
Can you post the code in /* "ValueFactory" here... */, or at least some code that makes it crash? The problem might be there. –  Alxandr Jun 9 '11 at 23:24
    
Multithreaded execution per chance? –  Gleno Jun 9 '11 at 23:25
    
@Gleno, wouldn't the true argument ensure that locks will be used to prevent instantiation on multiple threads? –  Jacob Jun 9 '11 at 23:27
    
@sixlettervariables, you should post that as an answer. The cached exception that gets thrown doesn't have an inner stacktrace pointing to the problem, but maybe the first time it is thrown it does. –  Jacob Jun 9 '11 at 23:28

5 Answers 5

The behavior of Lazy<T> is to cache exceptions thrown by the ValueFactory. This can lead to potentially confusing behavior due to the paucity of information given in the InvalidOperationException message. Microsoft was made aware of this issue through Connect, however, it is marked as Wont Fix as they feel there is enough information in the exception itself to diagnose the problem.

If there is an inner exception for the IOE you receive, it should (not saying it will) contain enough information to continue onwards. Another possibility is you have a try...catch blocks which rethrows exceptions (throw ex; instead of throw;), you will lose valuable information.

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

It turned out that this error only occurred when trying to inspect the Value property of the Lazy<> in the Visual Studio debugger. Doing so appeared to create a deadlock because the accessing of Value then seemed to hang the thread for a long time until the InvalidOperationException finally occurred. I could never intercept the original Exception, so I couldn't see the inner stacktrace.

I'm just chalking this up as a bug in Visual Studio or their implementation of Lazy<>.

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1  
+1 I agree with your thoughts that there is a bug in the implementation of Lazy<T> I encountered this same issue today and there are no exceptions raised in my code. To solve my issues I switched to using a property with a get { return _val ?? (_val = CreateVal()); } . –  Chris Marisic Mar 26 '12 at 18:59
ValueFactory attempted to access the Value property of this instance.

It may help somebody, I was able to fix that error by inspecting my entire ValueFactory procedure. In my example, I was creating a simple model and the linked it with some other data but during the linking process I was accessing the Value property in a singleton and that caused the error.

So accessing the Value of a Lazy object inside the ValueFactory throws such an error. As the error message is already indicating ;-)

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To make sure your exception isn't cached, use LazyThreadSafetyMode.PublicationOnly as a second parameter, instead of true.

Using true, you'll end up with a LazyThreadSafetyMode.ExecutionAndPublication. This will ensure only one thread enteres the ValueFactory method, but also ensures exceptions will be cached.

  private static Lazy<ConfigSource> _cfgSrc = new Lazy<ConfigSource>(
        () => { /* "ValueFactory" here... */ },
        LazyThreadSafetyMode.PublicationOnly);

See the link sixlettervariables provided for more information.

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I don't like that PublicationOnly still allows the initialization code to run in multiple threads (even if those extra results are discarded), but that is nice that exceptions aren't cached. –  Jacob Nov 10 '11 at 17:40

This has also happened to me with circular dependencies, so if these steps lead you nowhere, try double checking the stacktrace and verifying that there are no circular dependencies.

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