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I have a Play! Framework Job that executes every 30 seconds:

@Every("30s")
public class MyJob extends Job { ... }

This job does a few things such as reading e-mails and writing to the DB. However, it is possible that the job may not finish within 30 seconds. If the job takes longer than 30 seconds, I would like to kill the subsequent job that tries to start while the original job is still in progress. Is there a way to do this? or even pause the subsequent job until the original completes its work?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

as far as I know you don't have to kill the job. I created a job than had to run every minute, but in some scenarios it could (potentially) run for longer than a minute.

I did some testing, and be aware that I may have done them in the wrong way, but Play doesn't launch a new instance of the Job if it is already running. Once the job finishes, it will run the next instance in the expected time. Take it as if Play treats Jobs as "Singletons", only 1 of a given type active at a given time.

So, no, you don't need to kill or check anything. Awesome, isn't it? ;)

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yep that actually looks to be the case! Thanks Pere. –  digiarnie Jun 14 '11 at 6:19

You could use a ReentrantLock to prevent multiple instances from running at once. Something like this:

@Every("30s")
public class MyJob extends Job {
  /**
   * Used to avoid running multiple instances of this job simultaneously.
   */
  private static final ReentrantLock runningLock = new ReentrantLock();

  @Override
  public void doJob() {
    // sb: try to acquire the lock. if the lock is in use, then just
    // return immediately, because this job is already running.
    // wait a half second before giving up.
    if (!runningLock.tryLock(500, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS)) {
      // maybe log a message here?
      return;
    }

    // IMPORTANT: ANY CODE ADDED TO THIS METHOD MUST BE INSIDE THE TRY OR
    // YOU RUN THE RISK OF FAILING TO RELEASE THE LOCK!

    try {
      // perform your job code here...
    } finally {
      // sb: we're finished; release the lock
      runningLock.unlock();
    }
  }
}

Given that your job runs every 30 seconds, there is no reason to delay a job while another is running -- just cancel it.

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