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I'm writing a path tracer in C++ and I'd like to try and implement the most resource-intensive code into CUDA or OpenCL (I'm not sure which one to pick).

I've heard that my graphics card's version of CUDA doesn't support recursion, which is something my path tracer utilizes heavily.

As I have it coded both in Python and C++, I'll post some simplified Python code for readability:

def Trace(ray):
  hit = what_object_is_hit(ray)

  if not hit:
    return Color(0, 0, 0)

  newRay = hit.bouceChildRayOffSurface(ray)

  return hit.diffuse * (Trace(newRay) + hit.emittance)

I tried manually unrolling the function, and there is a definite pattern (d is diffuse and e is emittance):

Level 1:  d1 * e1 

Level 2:  d1 * d2 * e2
        + e1

Level 3:  d1 * d2 * d3 * e3
        + d1 * d2 * e2
        + e1

Level 4:  d1 * d2 * d3 * d4 * e4
        + d1 * d2 * d3 * e3
        + d1 * d2 * e2
        + e1

I might be wrong, though...

My question is, how would I go about implementing this code in a while loop?

I was thinking using something of this format:

total = Color(0, 0, 0)
n = 1

while n < 10:   # Maximum recursion depth
  result = magical_function()

  if not result:  break

  total += result
  n += 1

I've never really dealt with the task of unraveling a recursive function before, so any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
As it is now, the function is not tail-recursive. You will need to use a stack or make it tail-recursive. (There is an implicit stack in function calls.) –  user166390 Jun 10 '11 at 0:22
    
Question: what is hit? –  inspectorG4dget Jun 10 '11 at 0:29
    
hit is the object which the ray passes through. It differs each time. –  Blender Jun 10 '11 at 0:30
    
But hit is constant throughout the entire recursion? Or does it change even within the trace of a recursion? –  inspectorG4dget Jun 10 '11 at 0:32
    
Yes, it's redefined each iteration. That occurs within the code I omitted within the first code chunk. I'll edit it in to make that explicit... –  Blender Jun 10 '11 at 0:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In a recursive function, each time a recursive call occurs, the state of the caller is saved to a stack, then restored when the recursive call is complete. To convert a recursive function to an iterative one, you need to turn the state of the suspended function into an explicit data structure. Of course, you can create your own stack in software, but there are often tricks you can use to make your code more efficient.

This answer works through the transformation steps for this example. You can apply the same methods to other loops.

Tail Recursion Transformation

Let's take a look at your code again:

def Trace(ray):
  # Here was code to look for intersections

  if not hit:
      return Color(0, 0, 0)

  return hit.diffuse * (Trace(ray) + hit.emittance)

In general, a recursive call has to go back to the calling function, so the caller can finish what it's doing. In this case, the caller "finishes" by performing an addition and a multiplication. This produces a computation like d1 * (d2 * (d3 * (... + e3) + e2) + e1)). We can take advantage of the distributive law of addition and the associative laws of multiplication and addition to transform the calculation into [d1 * e1] + [(d1 * d2) * e2] + [(d1 * d2) * d3) * e3] + ... . Note that the first term in this series only refers to iteration 1, the second only refers to iterations 1 and 2, and so forth. That tells us that we can compute this series on the fly. Moreover, this series contains the series (d1, d1*d2, d1*d2*d3, ...), which we can also compute on the fly. Putting that back into the code:

def Trace(diffuse, emittance, ray):
  # Here was code to look for intersections

  if not hit: return emittance                            # The complete value has been computed

  new_diffuse = diffuse * hit.diffuse                     # (...) * dN
  new_emittance = emittance + new_diffuse * hit.emittance # (...) + [(d1 * ... * dN) + eN]
  return Trace(new_diffuse, new_emittance, ray)

Tail Recursion Elimination

In the new loop, the caller has no work to do after the callee finishes; it simply returns the callee's result. The caller has no work to finish, so it doesn't have to save any of its state! Instead of a call, we can overwrite the old parameters and go back to the beginning of the function (not valid Python, but it illustrates the point):

def Trace(diffuse, emittance, ray):
  beginning:
  # Here was code to look for intersections

  if not hit: return emittance                            # The complete value has been computed

  new_diffuse = diffuse * hit.diffuse                     # (...) * dN
  new_emittance = emittance + new_diffuse * hit.emittance # (...) + [(d1 * ... * dN) + eN]
  (diffuse, emittance) = (new_diffuse, new_emittance)
  goto beginning

Finally, we have transformed the recursive function into an equivalent loop. All that's left is to express it in Python syntax.

def Trace(diffuse, emittance, ray):
  while True:
    # Here was code to look for intersections

    if not hit: break

    diffuse = diffuse * hit.diffuse                 # (...) * dN
    emittance = emittance + diffuse * hit.emittance # (...) + [(d1 * ... * dN) + eN]

  return emittance
share|improve this answer
    
perhaps a decorator which encapsulates this pattern may also be useful code.activestate.com/recipes/… –  ninjagecko Jun 10 '11 at 2:04

You're in luck. Your code uses tail recursion, which is when you use recursion as the last thing in your function. The compiler can normally do it for you, but you'll have to do it manually here:

total = Color(0, 0, 0)
mult = 1
n = 1

while n < 10:   # Maximum recursion depth
  # Here was code to look for intersections

  if not hit: break

  total += mult * hit.diffuse * hit.emittance
  mult *= hit.diffuse
  n += 1

return total
share|improve this answer
    
The original code does not use tail recursion. It performs an add and a multiply after the recursive call. You can make it tail recursive, but that involves some nontrivial assumptions that a compiler probably won't make. Since the question was about how to eliminate recursion, I think it's important not to sweep those assumptions under the rug. –  Heatsink Jun 10 '11 at 1:18
    
Okay, I agree that it's not really tail recursion, but this treats it as such and it should still work. –  r2jitu Jun 10 '11 at 1:22
    
Well, either way, this code works perfectly. Thanks! –  Blender Jun 10 '11 at 1:44

Generally you can always represent recursion with a stack.

For example:

stack.push(Color(0,0,0), ray, 0) // color, ray, level#
while (!stack.empty()):
   current = stack.pop()
   if (current.level == 10): break
   // compute hit, and newray from current.ray
   stack.push(hit.diffuse*(current.color + hit.emittance), newray, current.level+1)
return current

Essentially recursion works by pushing the arguments of the function on to the stack and calling the function again with new arguments. You just have to emulate this using a stack.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, I'm a bit confused. stack contains both a hit (from .pop()), and the color value? hit is an object which randomly differs each time the while loop iterates (the ray reflects off of it and might hit another object, which then becomes hit). –  Blender Jun 10 '11 at 0:33
    
See my edit to the question. Sorry for not making that clear... –  Blender Jun 10 '11 at 0:36
    
Ok. I was confused by the different ray and color parameters. I updated the answer. –  Himadri Choudhury Jun 10 '11 at 0:48

For a data parallel implementation in OpenCL or CUDA, the lack of recursion isn't going to be the main problem. The hard part is data dependencies within iterations and how parallelism can be exposes with almost no inter thread communication at your disposal and no mutexes or locking mechanisms. It probably means you will be doing something like this:

For each depth

  1. For the set of active rays check each in parallel for intersections
  2. Do something like parallel stream compaction to cull out the misses
  3. Parallel compute the contribution of this depth to the active rays

The outer loop runs on the host, and each parallel operation becomes a separate kernel launch. It might seem counterintuitive to do it like this, but GPUs are effectively big SIMD machines and are very sensitiive to things like memory access patterns and branch divergence. There are quite a lot of papers on ray tracing using CUDA and OpenCL, it might pay to do a literature review before writing too much code.

share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking that it is quite easy to parallel compute with a GPU, as I can just trace one pixel/core. But thanks for the info, I didn't know that there are barely any thread communication things. –  Blender Jun 10 '11 at 1:43
    
Maybe assigning a fixed set of pixels/core will work? I'm not sure, as I'm still fiddling with CUDA and OpenCL... –  Blender Jun 10 '11 at 1:43
    
@Blender: you can't really do that in either CUDA or OpenCL. There is no guarantees about parallel execution order, hardware affinity or almost anything else related to code execution. All you know is that every thread will run, and that programmer defined (small) groups of threads will run concurrently, which allows limited local inter-thread synchronization and data sharing. Beyond that, the hardware and execution details are totally abstracted away in the programming model. –  talonmies Jun 10 '11 at 2:17
    
I can live with that, as I can just assign total/n pixels to n threads and wait for them to finish. It won't be optimal, but I guess it might work (no idea). –  Blender Jun 10 '11 at 2:50
    
@Blender: Yes that is how you would do it. The problem that can arise is one of data interdependence. If one thread requires the results of another thread, then there is an implicit execution order which the execution model generally can't honour. The solution is usually to split the operation up into multiple kernel launches. –  talonmies Jun 10 '11 at 2:56

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