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I'm visually "collapsing" some DOM elements using jQuery (by shrinking their width to 0px and fading them out) like this:

$(".slideoutmenu").animate({ width: 0, opacity: 0 }, function() { $(this).hide(); }); 

The width of these elements can vary, but the document is properly laid out through CSS without setting a specific width.

Normally, to re-show these elements I could simply do something like this:

$(".slideoutmenu").stop().show().css({ width: '', opacity: 1 });

However, I'd like to animate these elements in reverse (fade in, and expand).

Normally I'd do this with something similar to this:

$(this).children(".slideoutmenu").stop().show().animate({ width: 250, opacity: 1 });

So this is the obvious attempt:

$(this).children(".slideoutmenu").stop().show().animate({ width: "", opacity: 1 });

But this doesn't work.

Ultimately, the problem here is the fixed "250" number in the example above. This doesn't work because the widths are variable. I need to combine the result of using the empty string in the css setter and "animate"... but I can't figure out how to do this. I've tried replacing the "250" with 'undefined', 'null', '-1', '', and I've searched Google... to no avail.

I understand I can probably do some measurement trickery with the element hidden from the user - but I can't imagine this isn't a fairly common issue - so I'm hoping there is a "standard" way to do this, or that it's built in some how and I just don't know about it.

Thanks for reading.

FOLLOW UP:

Based on Michael's kind response, I put together a small quick-and-dirty plugin so I can accomplish this inline. (maybe someone can expand upon the plugin idea and make it better)

Here is the plugin:

(function( $ ){

  $.fn.cacheCss = function( prop ) {  

    return this.each(function() {

      var $this = $(this);


        if (prop instanceof Array)
        {
            for (var pname in prop)
            {
                if ($this.data('cssCache-' + prop[pname]) != undefined)
                    continue;

                $this.data('cssCache-' + prop[pname], $this.css(prop[pname]));
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if ($this.data('cssCache-' + prop) != undefined)
                return $this;

            $this.data('cssCache-' + prop, $this.css(prop));
        }

        return $this;

    });

  };


  $.fn.revertCss = function(settings, prop, animated) {  

    if (settings == null)
        settings = {};

    return this.each(function() {

      var $this = $(this);

        if (prop instanceof Array)
        {
            for (var pname in prop)
            {
                if ($this.data('cssCache-' + prop[pname]) != undefined)
                    settings[prop[pname]] = $this.data('cssCache-' + prop[pname]).replace(/px$/, "");               
            }
        }
        else
        {
            if ($this.data('cssCache-' + prop) != undefined)
                settings[prop] = $this.data('cssCache-' + prop).replace(/px$/, "");
        }

        if (!animated)
          return $this.css(settings);

        return $this.animate(settings);

    });

  };

})( jQuery );

And here is how I was able to modify my code to use it:

The origional line which set the css property:

$(".slideoutmenu").animate({ width: 0, opacity: 0 }, function() { $(this).hide(); }); 

was replaced by:

$(".slideoutmenu").cacheCss('width').animate({ width: 0, opacity: 0 }, function() { $(this).hide(); }); 

Now, ".cacheCss('width')" caches the value of the css property before I perform my animation.

And the line I had to "undo" those changes:

$(this).children(".slideoutmenu").stop().show().animate({ width: 250, opacity: 1 });

was replaced by this:

$(this).children(".slideoutmenu").stop().show().revertCss({ opacity: 1 }, 'width', true);

Now, ".revertCss(...)" will use the cached settings to revert my width property (animated!)

I made the plug accept arrays as well, so you could do this too:

.cacheCss(['width', 'height'])

and then:

.revertCss(null, ['width', 'height'], true)

the third parameter controls whether or not the revert is animated or not.

If you have other properties you want to animate at the same time (like i did with "opacity" in the example earlier) you can pass them in as the first parameter just like you would pass an object into the .animate() function.

I'm sure the plug could be GREATLY improved, but I thought it might be nice to throw it out there anyways.

Also, one more point - I had to replace spurrious "px" at the end of the css values... again, I'm sure there is probably a better way of doing that, but I just used a standard regex.

share|improve this question
    
I don't get how removing the width attribute will re-show the element? –  joakimdahlstrom Jun 10 '11 at 0:41
    
Fixed sample code to clarify... but the idea here is: the element start out with no particular fixed width. Then, it's given a width of 0 to "shrink" it. Then, there is no simply way I know of to animate the removal of that new, fixed width of "0". –  Steve Jun 10 '11 at 0:44
    
Just an FYI: the default value of width is 'auto', so to re-show the element, you should use width: 'auto' –  guzart Jun 10 '11 at 0:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You could store the width of the element pre-animation using jQuery data:

$(".slideoutmenu").each(function(){
    $(this).data('width', $(this).css('width'));
    $(this).animate({ 
        width: 0, 
        opacity: 0 
    }); 
});

$(".slideoutmenu").each(function(){
    $(this).children(".slideoutmenu").stop().animate({ 
        width: $(this).data('width'), 
        opacity: 1 
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Clever.... I like it. Thanks. –  Steve Jun 10 '11 at 0:56
1  
+1 Good question, and right answer. One way or another, you have to save the original width. Unfortunately, even jQuery can't figure it out what the dimensions would be while an element is not displayed. –  harpo Jun 10 '11 at 0:57
    
+1 thumbs up, learned something about .data(). –  joakimdahlstrom Jun 10 '11 at 0:59
    
Thanks again. I wrapped up that basic concept as a quick-and-dirty plugin, and posted it in the question. Thanks. Cheers. –  Steve Jun 10 '11 at 2:02
    
@Steve great work :) –  Michael Robinson Jun 10 '11 at 2:07

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