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Remove all the history in Firefox (delete all cookies), disable all add-ons and plugins, then restart Firefox. Do not go to any site and wait for about 10-15 min. Go to Options->...->Show cookies. You will see cookie named PREF with google.com domain.
1) Can somebody explain how and why this cookie appears?
2) How to get rid of this?

p.s I don't have any google desktop application installed. Firefox google search bar is removed too.

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your startup page is set to about:blank? –  Bacon Jun 10 '11 at 1:44
    
@user560833 yes –  Op De Cirkel Jun 10 '11 at 1:45
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The answer which you have accepted is not working for me. Did it ever work for you at all? –  gentmatt Mar 1 '14 at 18:28
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Turning off both safe-browsing checkboxes AND disabling ALL cookies still creates the Google.com PREF cookie for me! I even removed the Google URLs from about:config! –  Foo Bar Jun 12 '14 at 11:56
    
i found the .mozilla/<..profile_dir..>/cookies.sqlite -sqlite3-db-file where cookies are stored, removing the PREF-cookie there has no effect for me (!!) –  Lutz L. Sep 29 '14 at 10:32

7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This cookie is coming from Google's safebrowsing api:

google.com/safebrowsing/downloads?client=....

This is a known issue in firefox and there is an open ticket here:

https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=368255

EDIT To get rid of it, you can turn off the safebrowsing on the security tab (under Options), by un-checking the boxes to Block attacks and forgeries.

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As of today the answer is wrong. Google themselves officially state that the PREF cookie is used to store the information that you do not use Google's safebrowsing: The PREF cookie may store your preferences and other information, in particular your preferred language (e.g. English), how many search results you wish to have shown per page (e.g. 10 or 20), and whether or not you wish to have Google’s SafeSearch filter turned on –  gentmatt Mar 2 '14 at 20:07
    
@gentmatt disagree with you. I have this cookie on localhost, and only turn off block attacks and forgeries options, allowed me to delete it. –  HEX Mar 27 '14 at 16:30
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Turning off both safe-browsing checkboxes AND disabling ALL cookies still creates the Google.com PREF cookie for me! I even removed the Google URLs from about:config! –  Foo Bar Jun 12 '14 at 11:55
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For those who already have the google.com PREF cookie it may prove difficult to remove since you cannot delete the cookie from the cookie manager. You have to manually delete the cookie from the sqlite store. The relevant bug is #1026538. After opening the cookies database with sqlite3 cookies.sqlite3, you can delete the cookies with: DELETE FROM moz_cookies WHERE baseDomain = "google.com"; –  ariddell Aug 16 '14 at 11:15
    
@ariddell very useful comment, thanks! I also want to add that deleting ALL the cookies will do the job, too (deleting the file cookies.sqlite). Note also that it's dangerous, you really will have all your cookies deleted. –  Vasya Novikov Oct 9 '14 at 20:31

It's used by the NSA and GCHQ to spy on people!

http://rt.com/usa/nsa-advertisers-cookies-track-browsers-034/

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Why it appears?

As part of Safe Browsing, Web browsers ping Google periodically for updated lists of potentially dangerous sites. When they do, Google puts a cookie on the user’s machine. Google says the cookie helps it keep its system stable and monitor for attacks.

Source: The Google Cookie That Seems to Come Out of Nowhere

Why it keeps reappearing even after I delete it?

  1. Because you need to disable Safe Browsing
  2. AND because Firefox Cookie Manager can't delete it, even if it appears to (bug #1026538).

Why is it dangerous?

As this cookie contains a unique ID number, it has been used by the NSA to track people under suspicion. Source: NSA uses Google cookies to pinpoint targets for hacking, Washington Post

Also, it means Gogole can track you better since this unique ID is persistent even after you close Firefox.

Security often means less privacy. You can avoid sending all your browsing history to Google: Use an up-to-date browser and modules, disable uneeded browser modules, don't install apps/modules from untrusted sources and avoid phishing attempts by checking the website domain and HTTPS certificate.

How to really get rid of it?

  1. Disable Safe Browsing:

    1.1 Uncheck "Block reported attack sites" under Firefox Preferences > Security tab

    1.2. Uncheck "Block reported web forgeries" under Firefox Preferences > Security tab

  2. THEN manually delete the existing cookie with sqlite3 (as long as bug #1026538 is open)

    2.1. Find your Firefox cookie database within your Firefox profile folder:

    Firefox menu > Help button > Troubleshooting Information > Application Basics section > Profile folder line > Open Directory button > File name is cookies.sqlite

    or (Ubuntu) find ~/.mozilla/firefox -name cookies.sqlite

    2.2 Install sqlite3: Download or (Linux) sudo apt-get install sqlite3

    2.3 From command prompt: sqlite3path-to-cookies.sqlite

    2.4 DELETE FROM moz_cookies WHERE baseDomain = "google.com";

Now you can check that the PREF cookie doesn't reappear at Firefox launch in Firefox Cookie Manager. It should not reappear as long as you don't re-enable Safe Browsing and if you have configured Firefox to delete cookies after exit.

Recommeded tools to avoid tracking (except PREF cookie...): Self-Destructing Cookies and Disconnect.

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After Disabling Safe Browsing, it's easier to just delete the PREF cookie from the FF options, it's the same as going through the sqlite3 exercise posted in step 2. –  Peter Feb 2 at 11:53
    
Cookie Manager can't delete this cookie, even if it appears to. See stackoverflow.com/questions/6301114/… –  KrisWebDev Feb 13 at 15:26

Google has updated their policies page to explain what types of cookies they use, specifically the PREF cookie.

But beforehand I will say that I can't explain where and how this cookie pops up in the browser. It seems to be done by firefox itself even if you don't use Google search, Google safebrowsing and block cookies for °.google.com

Google's policies page states that:

Preferences

... The PREF cookie may store your preferences and other information, in particular your preferred language (e.g. English), how many search results you wish to have shown per page (e.g. 10 or 20), and whether or not you wish to have Google’s SafeSearch filter turned on.

Advertising

... Google uses cookies, like the PREF cookie, to help personalize ads on Google properties, like Google Search, particularly when you aren’t signed in to a Google account. ...

Maybe it's part of the undisclosed contract between Mozilla and Google to set this unblockable zombie cookie. Who knows? :-)

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Click Show Cookies - Don't just delete the Google cookie but click 'Remove All Cookies' Remove the check mark from the 'Accept cookies from sites' box

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It was possible to disable the google pref cookie in previous firefox-versions but since version 28 it is NOT possible to disable the google pref cookie! Mozilla integrated this cookie because google wants it - and google is paying millions of dollars for mozilla to keep this spying cookie in the firefox-browser enabled. Iam using now the comodo icedragon-browser, its based on firefox 26, you can install addons and themes from mozilla too, and most important you can disable the google-pref cookie: Go to options - privacy - enable custom settings - uncheck accepting cookies and remove the stored cookies if you have any (also add the links in which you login to the exception list). This cookie will never appear again. I hope Comodo dont update this browser to the newer ff-base.

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Another way in Firefox is to click Exceptions under Options/Privacy/"use custom settings for history"; type in "google.com" and click Block. That way google.com will not be stored on your computer from then on. (If you have a gmail address, you can't access it unless you store google's cookie).

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