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I'm trying to write a program that reads 2 numbers from the user and divides them. Here is the code I have so far:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class divideByZero {

public static int quotient(int numerator, int denominator)
{
   return numerator / denominator;
}

public static void main(String args[])
{
   Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);

    System.out.print("Please enter the first number: ");

    int numerator = scanner.nextInt();

    System.out.print("Please enter the second number: ");

    int denominator = scanner.nextInt();

    int result = quotient( numerator, denominator );

    float result2 = (float)result;

    System.out.printf("\n The first number %d divided by the second number "
            + "%d = %f\n", numerator, denominator, result2 );

}

I'm having problems with the computations. For example, when I enter 3 divided by 4, I get the result 0.000000. How do I get the correct result to 2 decimal places?

share|improve this question
    
probably easier to just use Scanner.nextFloat() instead of nextInt(), and store all the data as floats, if you want a float output. – Alex Ghiculescu Jun 10 '11 at 2:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Cast the numerator and denominator as floats before you divide them.

import java.util.Scanner;

public class divideByZero {

public static float quotient(float numerator, float denominator)
{
   return numerator / denominator;
}

public static void main(String args[])
{
   Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);

    System.out.print("Please enter the first number: ");

    int numerator = scanner.nextInt();

    System.out.print("Please enter the second number: ");

    int denominator = scanner.nextInt();

    float result = quotient( (float) numerator, (float) denominator );

    System.out.printf("\n The first number %d divided by the second number "
            + "%d = %f\n", numerator, denominator, result );

}
share|improve this answer
    
It should likely be using double, as Novazero said. – Lawrence Dol Jun 10 '11 at 2:43
    
Probably since he probably won't go over the double limit and float takes more memory space, but he used float in his post, so I just used the same. – Jon Jun 10 '11 at 2:44
    
Oops, no amount of casting will improve the int return from quotient (should be float quotient(float numerator, float denominator)). Also the casts of the int arguments are unnecessary. – Lawrence Dol Jun 10 '11 at 2:45
    
Ah, missed the int on the function. Also, Java casts parameters by default? – Jon Jun 10 '11 at 2:46
1  
Actually, you may not be able to cast an int to a float implicitly, since that's a narrowing cast... but int should cast to double just fine, which I already made to point these should be. – Lawrence Dol Jun 10 '11 at 2:48

The following changes will do what you need.

public static float quotient(int numerator, int denominator)
{
    return (float)numerator / (float)denominator;
}

float result = quotient( numerator, denominator );

System.out.printf("\n The first number %d divided by the second number "
        + "%d = %.2f\n", numerator, denominator, result2 );

You cannot do division on an int and get a fractional int (there is no such thing), so the division must be done with floats and stored into a float. The %.2f limits it to 2 decimal places.

share|improve this answer

Why don't you use the datatype double instead of float?

Here is some code to format into two decimal points:

import java.text.*;

public class DecimalPlaces {

   public static void main(String[] args) {

       double d = 1.234567;
       DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#.##");
       System.out.print(df.format(d));
   }

}
share|improve this answer

You are getting 0.0000 because you are dividing integer numbers and storing that result back into an integer. To see the fractional part, you can declare result to be a float variable.

When that's working, to print 2 decimals you can use printf formatting.

In C it'd be something like %.2f.

Based on the errors, I think you'd benefit from reading about data types, especially floating point numbers.

share|improve this answer

If you change the return type of the quotient method from an int to a float, it will no longer round the answer to the nearest integer.

public static float quotient(int numerator, int denominator)
{
   return (float) numerator / (float) denominator;
}
share|improve this answer

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