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In a *nix shell, you can say:

foo `bar | baz`;

to redirect the output of bar | baz into the argument of foo.

How do you do this in a Windows batch file?

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Have you checked out for /f? –  Gabe Jun 10 '11 at 3:36
    
@Gabe: Nope... I just looked at it, but I can't figure out how it works/helps... –  Mehrdad Jun 10 '11 at 3:46
    
The FOR /F ["options"] %variable IN ('command') syntax provides a way to process the output of a command. You can then do something like FOR /F %x IN ('bar | baz') DO foo %x. –  Gabe Jun 10 '11 at 4:54
    
@Gabe: That's the answer I was looking for, thanks!! Post it as an answer please and I'll accept it. :-) –  Mehrdad Jun 10 '11 at 5:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The FOR /F ["options"] %variable IN ('command') syntax provides a way to process the output of a command. You can then do something like FOR /F %x IN ('bar | baz') DO foo %x.

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Awesome, thanks! –  Mehrdad Jun 10 '11 at 5:12
    
@Mehrdad: If I'm not mistaken, there's a difference regarding multi-line output, which you should be aware of. In *nix the entire output would be substituted for bar | baz and so foo would be invoked once. With FOR /F you'd get multiple invocations of foo for every line produced by 'bar | baz'. If I'm wrong, I'm sure I'll be corrected. –  Andriy M Jun 10 '11 at 5:39
    
@Andriy: Thanks for the heads-up, I'll remember that. –  Mehrdad Jun 10 '11 at 5:42
    
@Andriy: You are correct. However, it's so rare that one attemps to pass multiple lines in a command line argument that I didn't think it worth mentioning. –  Gabe Jun 10 '11 at 5:43

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